Mobile and Wireless: Android Security Is a Major Threat: 10 Reasons Why

 
 
By Don Reisinger  |  Posted 2012-04-04 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Security has always been a major concern for consumers, but it's especially important for enterprise users. In far too many cases, malicious hackers are able to take control of a computer, steal sensitive information or use it against millions across the world. On the Web, hackers take every opportunity to try and take down sites or turn them into their own personal Trojan-delivering friends. However, in recent years, a new threat has emerged that, at least so far, few people know enough about: mobile security. From Android to Symbian and even, in some cases, iOS, operating systems across the mobile market are being targeted by malicious hackers. Users of those operating systems, meanwhile, do little to safeguard themselves from those threats. In a world where the trend to bring your own device (BYOD) is becoming the norm, the worlds of consumer and business security are starting to collide. Interestingly, over the last year or so, Android has become the chief target for malicious hackers. According to several reports, cyber-crooks are targeting the Android operating system since it's essentially open and the sheer number of people using the platform makes it a worthwhile option. But there are still many people that don't believe Android security is a major threat to them. Those people need to wake up. Here's a look at why Android security is a growing threat.
 
 
 

The Numbers Are Growing

Unfortunately for today's Android users, they're facing more threats because there are more of them using the operating system. As in the PC space, mobile hackers want to target the operating system that's most likely to deliver a major financial return. For now, that's Android.
The Numbers Are Growing
 
 
 
 
 
Don Reisinger is a freelance technology columnist. He started writing about technology for Ziff-Davis' Gearlog.com. Since then, he has written extremely popular columns for CNET.com, Computerworld, InformationWeek, and others. He has appeared numerous times on national television to share his expertise with viewers. You can follow his every move at http://twitter.com/donreisinger.
 
 
 
 
 
 

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