Enterprise Mobility: Barnes and Noble's Nook Tablet: Kindle Fire Competition

 
 
By Nicholas Kolakowski  |  Posted 2011-11-07 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Barnes & Noble's just-unveiled Nook Tablet is the bookseller's way of showing it's unbowed by Amazon's recent revamping of its Kindle line. The 7-inch Nook Tablet runs Android Gingerbread and, in addition to providing a wide variety of e-books and periodicals via an online storefront, also offers the ability to watch video. At the same time, Barnes & Noble has updated its grayscale Nook Simple Touch and last year's Nook Color with more powerful software and lower price points. Will the Nook Tablet hold its own against Amazon's full-color Kindle Fire, which can display video from the online retailer's considerable library of streaming content? Rather than launch its own streaming storefront, Barnes & Noble has partnered with a variety of companies to offer content, and the Nook Tablet features apps from the likes of Netflix and Pandora. On the e-reading side of the equation, the bookseller has deals with companies like comic book maker Marvel for content.??íFor better or worse, though, anything introduced by Barnes & Noble will inevitably end up being compared with Amazon products. Company executives used the Nov. 7 unveiling of the Nook Tablet to take some not-so-subtle swipes at the rival device. Among their claims: the Nook Tablet boasts a wider viewing angle to the Kindle Fire, and its memory capacity is superior. The real decision over which device is better, however, will be left to consumers. The Nook Tablet will reach store shelves "on or about" Nov. 17, according to Barnes & Noble, at a price of $249.??í??í??í
 
 
 

Nook vs. Kindle

Barnes & Noble hopes its revamped line of Nook devices will blunt the impact of Amazon's own updated Kindle e-readers.
Nook vs. Kindle
 
 
 
 
 
Nicholas Kolakowski is a staff editor at eWEEK, covering Microsoft and other companies in the enterprise space, as well as evolving technology such as tablet PCs. His work has appeared in The Washington Post, Playboy, WebMD, AARP the Magazine, AutoWeek, Washington City Paper, Trader Monthly, and Private Air. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.
 
 
 
 
 
 

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