Enterprise Mobility: HTC, Motorola, LG Tablets and Smartphones: Stars of CTIA

 
 
By Nicholas Kolakowski  |  Posted 2011-03-24 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Apple CEO Steve Jobs may have claimed during the iPad 2 unveiling event that 2011 would be the year of his company's tablet, but the manufacturers and carriers filling the show floor at CTIA evidently beg to differ. By and large, the tablets on display packed a good deal of power under the hood—often a dual-core processor, and an average of 32GB of internal memory—frequently paired with the tablet-optimized Google Android 3.0 (code-named "Honeycomb"). The smartphones on display proved equally powerful, with processors and upgraded hardware such as high-megapixel cameras. Some of these devices' new features tended toward the more gimmicky, such as the 3D cameras integrated into both Sprint's HTC Evo View 4G and T-Mobile's LG G-Slate. Whether consumers and businesses gravitate toward shooting 3D footage, nearly everyone who purchases an Android-based tablet will more likely appreciate the rapidly growing Android Marketplace and customizable Honeycomb home screens. Nor was Android the only presence on the floor. Microsoft and its manufacturing partners showed off some new Windows Phone 7 devices, which feature updated software features such as cut-and-paste. And for business users, Research In Motion is dangling the imminent prospect of its PlayBook, a BlackBerry-branded tablet. All of these manufacturers, of course, are looking to give Jobs and company a run for their money. But which device will prove the breakout hit is something the markets may take months to decide.
 
 
 

HTC Evo View 4G

This Sprint tablet uses a 1.5GHz processor to power, not only its multimedia functions, but also shooting and viewing 3D footage. The 7-inch tablet is also capable of running on both 3G and 4G networks.
HTC Evo View 4G
 
 
 
 
 
Nicholas Kolakowski is a staff editor at eWEEK, covering Microsoft and other companies in the enterprise space, as well as evolving technology such as tablet PCs. His work has appeared in The Washington Post, Playboy, WebMD, AARP the Magazine, AutoWeek, Washington City Paper, Trader Monthly, and Private Air. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.
 
 
 
 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...

 
Manage your Newsletters: Login   Register My Newsletters























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rocket Fuel