Mobile App Development for Less

 
 
By Jason Brooks  |  Posted 2001-11-12 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Intava Corp.'s Gravity 1.0, a graphical mobile Web development tool, enables companies to target multiple device platforms without investing in costly transcoding server software.

Intava Corp.s Gravity 1.0, a graphical mobile Web development tool, enables companies to target multiple device platforms without investing in costly transcoding server software.

In eWeek Labs tests of Gravity, which shipped last month, we could drag and drop our way to mobile Web pages, from which Gravity would generate Palm Inc. and WAP (Wireless Application Protocol) 1.1 device-optimized versions of the pages we created.

In this capability, Gravity bore a resemblance to iConverse Inc.s Mobile Studio 2.0, reviewed last spring. (eWeek Labs May 6 review of a late beta of iConverse 2.0 is at www.eweek.com/links.) However, as a server-based transcoding system, Mobile Studio cost $100,000 and required a separate Java application server.

Gravity, priced at $695 for a multiplatform version or $495 for a Palm-only or WAP-only version, presents a much lower point of entry and will enable companies or departments that cant invest heavily in wireless to begin serving static Web content and collecting basic data over mobile devices. For more complex, database-centered Web applications, companies should look to a server-based product such as Mobile Studio 2.0 or ThinAirApps Inc.s Identicon DB.

Gravity produces WML (Wireless Markup Language) pages optimized for Nokia Corp. or Openwave Systems Inc. WAP browsers, as well as PQAs (Palm query applications) for Palm devices.

Although developers can build WAP and PQA projects with a text editor and freely available software development kits from device vendors, Gravity keeps page versions organized and reduces the need for hard coding.

Intava plans to support Pocket PC devices in a future release, and wed like to see support for Research In Motion Ltd. devices as well.



 
 
 
 
As Editor in Chief of eWEEK Labs, Jason Brooks manages the Labs team and is responsible for eWEEK's print edition. Brooks joined eWEEK in 1999, and has covered wireless networking, office productivity suites, mobile devices, Windows, virtualization, and desktops and notebooks. Jason's coverage is currently focused on Linux and Unix operating systems, open-source software and licensing, cloud computing and Software as a Service. Follow Jason on Twitter at jasonbrooks, or reach him by email at jbrooks@eweek.com.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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