Enterprise Mobility: Nokia's Lumia 710 Readies to Face the Android Army

 
 
By Nicholas Kolakowski  |  Posted 2011-12-15 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Nokia and T-Mobile are prepping to launch the former's first Windows Phone in the United States, the Lumia 710. As part of their efforts to get the phone in as many users' hands as possible, the Lumia 710 is priced at $49 with a two-year contract. Whether that will help Nokia gain traction against the Google Android devices flooding the midmarket remains to be seen, but it's undeniable that, despite the low price, the Lumia 710 features some solid specs, including a 1.4GHz processor, a 3.7-inch touch screen and the newly revamped Windows Phone interface. The device will go on sale Jan. 11. "The intended audience is the first-time smartphone buyers," Chris Weber, president of Nokia's U.S. division, told eWEEK Dec. 13. "That is by far the biggest opportunity for us in the U.S." Nokia is also angling to make the Lumia 710 a go-to device for those first-time buyers normally intimidated by smartphone technology. Internationally, Nokia is also pushing a higher-end Lumia 800, but Weber and other executives remain reluctant to share when that device might make an appearance in this country. Nokia abandoned its homegrown operating systems earlier this year in favor of Windows Phone, making Microsoft's software the ultimate bet for the company: If the Lumia 710 and other devices don't succeed in the marketplace, the Finnish phone maker lacks a fallback position. But between the low price and the higher-end specs, it's clear that Nokia is willing to push hard to succeed.
 
 
 

Midmarket Price

Nokia and T-Mobile are pricing the Lumia 710 at $49 in the United States with a two-year contract, clearly aiming at a U.S. midmarket increasingly dominated by Google Android devices.
Midmarket Price
 
 
 
 
 
Nicholas Kolakowski is a staff editor at eWEEK, covering Microsoft and other companies in the enterprise space, as well as evolving technology such as tablet PCs. His work has appeared in The Washington Post, Playboy, WebMD, AARP the Magazine, AutoWeek, Washington City Paper, Trader Monthly, and Private Air. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.
 
 
 
 
 
 

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