Enterprise Mobility: Sony Tablets, Intel-Powered Robots, Ultrabooks at CEATEC

 
 
By Nicholas Kolakowski  |  Posted 2011-10-05 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sony tablets, Toshiba ultra-thin notebooks, robots powered by Intel, televisions from Panasonic and other companies, and a host of power-boosting devices are among the highlights at Japan's CEATEC show, which shows off products for both the Japanese and international markets. In many cases, these devices eventually find their way to the United States. In the wake of the massive earthquake and powerful tsunami that hit eastern Japan earlier in March, many of the tech companies here have focused on ways to keep devices powered even in the absence of an electrical grid. Walking the show floor here, you see everything from solar panels meant to power houses to electric vehicles capable of efficient travel on fairly little charge. U.S. consumers, though, will probably be most interested in a glimpse at technology that might end up in their hands over the next year or so. To that end, there are devices such as the Sony Tablet S and Tablet P, the latter featuring dual 5.5-inch touch screens that can fold along a central hinge. Android-powered tablets from Toshiba and other companies are appearing here, loaded with familiar software. Intel and various hardware manufacturers are also pushing Intel-based super-thin "ultrabooks meant to take their own piece of the mobility market. Japan's tech companies clearly want to show they can offer innovation in a variety of ways.
 
 
 

Robots

Not all Japanese robots are meant to be cute. This wearable one developed by Cyberdyne and powered by Intel monitors the users brain signals and uses that to operate the mechanical legs.
Robots
 
 
 
 
 
Nicholas Kolakowski is a staff editor at eWEEK, covering Microsoft and other companies in the enterprise space, as well as evolving technology such as tablet PCs. His work has appeared in The Washington Post, Playboy, WebMD, AARP the Magazine, AutoWeek, Washington City Paper, Trader Monthly, and Private Air. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.
 
 
 
 
 
 

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