TwitterPeek: A Christmas Gift with Caveats

 
 
By Clint Boulton  |  Posted 2009-12-02 Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Peek in November began selling the TwitterPeek, a device that lets users access Twitter and nothing else. TwitterPeek comes in a small carrying case and measures four inches long, 2.7 inches wide and one-quarter inch thick. It includes a full QWERTY keyboard, and a click scroll wheel on the right side of the device, which is the key to navigating the TwitterPeek. Is this a good Christmas gift? Yes, but only if the user is a major Twitter user and won't mind paying for the service when his or her contract expires.

When I wrote about the TwitterPeek back in November, I was intrigued about this gadget, which lets users access and and post tweets to Twitter.

I asked its maker, Peek, to send me a copy to test. Peek was kind enough to comply, and I soon received a charcoal gray device (it also comes in Twitter blue) with which to play.

Unlike a smartphone, which lets you do any number of computing tasks, you can pretty much just play with a TwitterPeek. Think of it as an above average game on a Nintendo DS.

TwitterPeek comes in a small carrying case and measures four inches long, 2.7 inches wide and one-quarter inch thick. It includes a full QWERTY keyboard, and a click scroll wheel on the right side of the device, which is the key to navigating the TwitterPeek.

TwitterPeek is powered by a rechargeable, lithium ion battery, good for a whole day or more of tweeting, depending on use. You recharge the device by connecting its standard AC charger to a micro USB port on the gadget.

Once I turned on the device, it walked me through four screens telling me how to navigate it, then let me enter my Twitter user name and password. Boom, I was in and could see all of my tweets, or at least parts of my tweets.

One of the knocks on the device is you have to push the scroll wheel, which is basically your enter button, to read a whole tweet, which is what we're accustomed to seeing from our smartphones and computers. Pushing on the scroll wheel also reveals a menu on the right-side of the Twitter screen.

Menu options are plentiful and include, from top to bottom: view tweet, reply, retweet, new tweet, new direct message, my @mentions, direct messages, my tweets, search feed, view user feed, following, followers and settings. The back button sits right under the scroll wheel, and it easily the scroll wheel's constant companion.

TwitterPeek's keyboard is great, with keys spaced widely enough and raised enough to avoid tripping onto other unintended keys. Typing to reply to tweets or retweet was a snap, as was checking @mentions, direct messages and my tweets.

I quickly got used to clicking the scroll wheel to see tweets in their entirety, but Peek offers a number of shortcuts that make the device much easier to use and keep your fingers from getting bored. For example, users can type C or T on the keyboard to send a new tweet R to reply to tweet, D to send a direct message, or Shift, then R to retweet.



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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