Kanoodles Approach

 
 
By Matthew Hicks  |  Posted 2005-01-26 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


At iVillage Inc., a site targeted to women, AdSense has helped generate new revenue for its e-mail newsletters, said Carl Fischer, the companys vice president of corporate communications The New York-based company produces newsletters on topics ranging from health and fitness to relationships and parenting. Fischer said the AdSense newsletter ads complement the types of ads that iVillage sells directly to advertisers and perform as well as, if not better than, the sponsored listings on Web pages. "It sort of was just a natural next step for us," Fischer said. "The newsletters are very targeted in terms of the audience [so] it made sense for us to want to pursue this avenue."
What about bloggers? Click here to read about Google extending AdSense to blogs.
Kanoodle is taking a broader approach with its sponsored listings as it attempts to differentiate itself from Google and Yahoo Inc.s Overture Service, the dominant sponsored-links players. Viewing itself as a media company, Kanoodle last year began expanding beyond its ContextTarget program, which displays ads based on a Web pages content. Beyond that program, it has added one called BehaviorTarget, which uses behavioral tracking to determine which listings to display. So, visitors to a news site may see financial services ads because they have repeatedly visited banking sites. Kanoodle also offers LocalTarget for placing local ads on pages with local content.
"What were hearing from our publishers is that content does not mean context," said Mark Josephson, senior vice president of marketing and business development at Kanoodle. "To use only one method, context, is not enough." Kanoodle already has begun selling ads for BehaviorTarget and LocalTarget, and later this quarter it will allow its BrightAds self-service publishers to specifically choose among the various ad types, said Kanoodle CEO Lance Podell. On the RSS (Really Simple Syndication) advertising front, Kanoodle also has reached deals with about a dozen publishers to include ContextTarget ads in RSS news feeds. It expects to extend RSS ads as an option to self-service publishers later this year. Click here to read more about Overtures RSS ad plans. Further out in the year, Kanoodle wants to automate the selection of sponsored-link types for publishers, essentially using algorithms to determine the best mix of ads for a publishers various pages and mediums, Podell said. Another emerging market for Kanoodle is that of blogs. The company struck a deal to offer its sponsored-links programs later this quarter to bloggers using Six Apart Ltd.s TypePad publishing service. "We dont prepackage everyone and say that all blogs and all Web pages are created equal," Podell said. Check out eWEEK.coms for the latest news, views and analysis on enterprise search technology.


 
 
 
 
Matthew Hicks As an online reporter for eWEEK.com, Matt Hicks covers the fast-changing developments in Internet technologies. His coverage includes the growing field of Web conferencing software and services. With eight years as a business and technology journalist, Matt has gained insight into the market strategies of IT vendors as well as the needs of enterprise IT managers. He joined Ziff Davis in 1999 as a staff writer for the former Strategies section of eWEEK, where he wrote in-depth features about corporate strategies for e-business and enterprise software. In 2002, he moved to the News department at the magazine as a senior writer specializing in coverage of database software and enterprise networking. Later that year Matt started a yearlong fellowship in Washington, DC, after being awarded an American Political Science Association Congressional Fellowship for Journalist. As a fellow, he spent nine months working on policy issues, including technology policy, in for a Member of the U.S. House of Representatives. He rejoined Ziff Davis in August 2003 as a reporter dedicated to online coverage for eWEEK.com. Along with Web conferencing, he follows search engines, Web browsers, speech technology and the Internet domain-naming system.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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