The Buzz: May 27, 2002

 
 
By eweek  |  Posted 2002-05-27 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

When the popular web search site Google last week began redesigning its logo—again—it received a little extra help.

Dilbert Dabbles With Google Logo

When the popular web search site Google last week began redesigning its logo—again—it received a little extra help.

Throughout the week, the cartoon character Dilbert, the cubicle-dwelling malcontent; his pointy-haired boss; and a co-worker, Alice, appeared on the search sites home page in comic strips detailing their work in trying to redesign Googles logo.

Google officials said Dilberts help reflects the companys "unusual corporate culture, where nothing is taken seriously, except for search." Dilberts creator, Scott Adams, said the partnership "exceeded my wildest dreams. I hoped I would get a free Google shirt, and I got three of them—plus a mug."

Google has a history of changing its logo for special events and holidays.

Virus Attacks Kazaa Network

Viruses are appearing in every aspect of online computing—including peer-to-peer file sharing.

Kaspersky Laboratories last week found what some said could be the first virus unique to the P2P network Kazaa. Its not terribly harmful, but it exposes weaknesses in the system. Kaspersky posted an advisory saying that the Worm.Kazaa.Benjamin virus transmits itself using the Kazaa network, spreading when users of the service download infected files or via manual transmission.

According to Kaspersky, when the virus enters a computer, it opens a Web page hosted on a German site.

House Votes for Childrens Domain

The push for a safe online haven for children got a boost last week when the U.S. House of Representatives voted, 406-2, to pass a bill that would create a child-friendly Internet zone.

The goal is to make this zone—which would be set up within the .us Internet domain—free of violence and pornography, with content considered appropriate for persons aged 12 and younger. The sites would come with a .kids.us address.

NeuStar, which manages the .us domain, would police the Web sites in the childrens area.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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