Utility Computing Befits New Media

 
 
By Peter Coffee  |  Posted 2003-10-20 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Digital media creation, delivery and management are growing at roughly three times the pace of all other IT needs, estimated IBM Vice President for Digital Media Warren Hart when we spoke earlier this month in Los Angeles after his keynote speech at the C

Digital media creation, delivery and management are growing at roughly three times the pace of all other IT needs, estimated IBM Vice President for Digital Media Warren Hart when we spoke earlier this month in Los Angeles after his keynote speech at the ContentWorld conference.

The nature of those tasks—intense computational workloads during content creation and high peak-to-average ratios for content delivery demand—makes them complementary to the on-demand or utility computing models gaining mind share among IT providers.

Point-of-contact displays in retail environments, Hart observed, can now be deployed using wireless technology to reduce deployment cost and make it easier to move displays. Content can also vary by time of day to reflect different types of customers. These might include "mall walkers in the morning, teenagers in the afternoon [and] adults in the evening," Hart said.

Supply chain partners are also getting into the act, Hart said. Consumer goods providers will pay for displays and computer infrastructure if they give partners a chance to deliver their own message at the point where the customer makes a decision, he said.

Its not effective, though, to present repurposed TV commercials, Hart said. Whats needed is content thats dynamic enough to engage the customer, something that fits in the space between conventional video and mere static displays, he said.

 
 
 
 
Peter Coffee is Director of Platform Research at salesforce.com, where he serves as a liaison with the developer community to define the opportunity and clarify developers' technical requirements on the company's evolving Apex Platform. Peter previously spent 18 years with eWEEK (formerly PC Week), the national news magazine of enterprise technology practice, where he reviewed software development tools and methods and wrote regular columns on emerging technologies and professional community issues.Before he began writing full-time in 1989, Peter spent eleven years in technical and management positions at Exxon and The Aerospace Corporation, including management of the latter company's first desktop computing planning team and applied research in applications of artificial intelligence techniques. He holds an engineering degree from MIT and an MBA from Pepperdine University, he has held teaching appointments in computer science, business analytics and information systems management at Pepperdine, UCLA, and Chapman College.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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