CompTIA Unveils Entry-Level Security Certification

 
 
By Lisa Vaas  |  Posted 2002-02-11 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

CompTIA announced last week it is developing a new, vendor-neutral, entry-level security certification that will address training on firewalls, viruses, user authentication and encryption.

CompTIA announced last week it is developing a new, vendor-neutral, entry-level security certification that will address training on firewalls, viruses, user authentication and encryption. The Computing Technology Industry Association, in Oakbrook Terrace, Ill., expects to name the certification by the end of the month. CompTIA is only now bringing together a committee to determine the questions that will be used in the certification, which is expected to launch in the third quarter, according to a spokeswoman. CompTIA officials point to a growing need for security skills as the driver behind the new certification. "There is no greater need in the IT industry than bulletproof security," said Fran Linhart, director of certifications at CompTIA, in a statement. "We must protect invaluable company and customer data from criminal, terrorist and other threats that disrupt businesses and put people and companies in harms way.
CompTIA, a non-profit trade association of some 9,000 members in 63 countries, is well-known for its other entry-level certifications, including Network+ for network administrators and A+ for hardware technicians. These entry-level certifications are often used as a foundation for higher-level, vendor-specific certifications and degree programs.
 
 
 
 
Lisa Vaas is News Editor/Operations for eWEEK.com and also serves as editor of the Database topic center. Since 1995, she has also been a Webcast news show anchorperson and a reporter covering the IT industry. She has focused on customer relationship management technology, IT salaries and careers, effects of the H1-B visa on the technology workforce, wireless technology, security, and, most recently, databases and the technologies that touch upon them. Her articles have appeared in eWEEK's print edition, on eWEEK.com, and in the startup IT magazine PC Connection. Prior to becoming a journalist, Vaas experienced an array of eye-opening careers, including driving a cab in Boston, photographing cranky babies in shopping malls, selling cameras, typography and computer training. She stopped a hair short of finishing an M.A. in English at the University of Massachusetts in Boston. She earned a B.S. in Communications from Emerson College. She runs two open-mic reading series in Boston and currently keeps bees in her home in Mashpee, Mass.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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