Palamida Launches Code Vulnerability Reporting Tool

 
 
By Chris Preimesberger  |  Posted 2007-04-27 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The VRS package enhances CTOs' control over their companies' software by pinpointing known security risks in open-source code, Palamida says.

SAN FRANCISCO—Software intellectual-property management services provider Palamida on April 27 introduced a new service that works to identify vulnerabilities in an enterprises open-source code. The announcement was made at the annual Gartner Symposium/ITxpo: Emerging Trends at the Moscone Center here. Palamidas Vulnerability Reporting Solution works as a plug-in to the companys code audit compliance solution, IP Amplifier, to "identify, prioritize and spotlight the location of known vulnerabilities" in open-source code, a Palamida spokesperson said.
Palamidas library contains more than 3 terabytes worth of content, including 140,000 OSS (open-source software) projects, 780,000 additional versions, 7 billion source code snippets, 10 million Java namespaces, 500 million binary file IDs, and Java, C/C++, Perl, Python, PHP, C# and VB signatures, the spokesperson said.
The VRS uses data from the National Vulnerability Database, a comprehensive cyber-security database sponsored by the Department of Homeland Security and run by the National Institute of Standards and Technology and MITRE. The National Vulnerability Database integrates all publicly available U.S. government vulnerability resources and provides references to industry resources for the purpose of assisting with remediation efforts. It currently contains over 23,700 known vulnerabilities, 89 US-CERT issued alerts and 1,900 US-CERT vulnerability notes, and has a publication rate of approximately 18 new vulnerabilities per day. For advice on how to secure your network and applications, as well as the latest security news, visit Ziff Davis Internets Security IT Hub.
Readily available code resources, the increase of geographically distributed development teams and ever-increasing time-to-market pressures have resulted in the blending of homegrown, third-party and open-source components, the spokesperson said. The sheer size of a code base coupled with the number of contributing developers makes it difficult for companies to get an accurate assessment of their software assets. "Successful IT Governance requires risk mitigation at the code level. Customers should be utilizing vulnerability analysis solutions to identify and remediate application risks," Palamida CEO Mark Tolliver said. "The VRS works together with vulnerability analysis solutions to bridge the gap between proprietary code analysis and complete code analysis." Most companies operate without any knowledge of exactly what their software is made of and whether or not it contains security risks. The root cause of many application security vulnerabilities resides in the code base—an area that traditional security software cannot protect, Tolliver said. Existing vulnerability analysis solutions scan customers proprietary code to identify potential vulnerability holes such as buffer overrides and network and intrusion detection gaps. They also highlight violations in secure coding practices. The VRS, on the other hand, augments the IT governance process by scanning the customers code base and pinpointing the existence of open-source content, highlighting any known vulnerabilities and delivering a prioritized report to assist with remediation efforts, the spokesperson said. Click here to read a Q&A with Palamidas CEO on the growth of opportunities relating to open source. Michael Cote, an analyst with RedMonk, told eWEEK that the important thing in this release is that it builds on the code auditing thats already in the Palamida platform. "Its true that there are a handful of vendors that work in the same space, but Palamida is approaching the sector in their own way technologically: building up the database of open-source projects, and then layering on more software auditing and health checks, " Cote said. "What I like about the code auditing and code-health approach that companies in this problem space do is that it lets developers work at the fast pace theyd like to without being slowed down by manual auditing processes," Cote said. "Adding in things like venerability checking adds more value to these platforms in that the platform is further automating previously manual processes." San Francisco-based Palamida and Black Duck Software, headquartered in Waltham, Mass., are the primary companies working in this space today, although other entrants are likely to emerge, Forrester Senior Analyst Michael Goulde told eWEEK. "Their products and services address two of the leading concerns many companies have about software in general, not just open-source software: security and intellectual property rights," Goulde said. The two companies have taken somewhat different directions in terms of the markets they address and their go-to-market approaches, Goulde said. "What theyre doing is more than code searching," Goulde said. "They need to identify and flag specific issues by using a wealth of data theyve collected from a variety of sources. It isnt good enough to know that a particular piece of code is being used, because in one context that can be perfectly OK and in another, there can be serious licensing or IP issues. So putting all the pieces together to present a complete picture is what both companies are trying to do for their customers." Check out eWEEK.coms Security Center for the latest security news, reviews and analysis. And for insights on security coverage around the Web, take a look at eWEEKs Security Watch blog.
 
 
 
 
Chris Preimesberger Chris Preimesberger was named Editor-in-Chief of Features & Analysis at eWEEK in November 2011. Previously he served eWEEK as Senior Writer, covering a range of IT sectors that include data center systems, cloud computing, storage, virtualization, green IT, e-discovery and IT governance. His blog, Storage Station, is considered a go-to information source. Chris won a national Folio Award for magazine writing in November 2011 for a cover story on Salesforce.com and CEO-founder Marc Benioff, and he has served as a judge for the SIIA Codie Awards since 2005. In previous IT journalism, Chris was a founding editor of both IT Manager's Journal and DevX.com and was managing editor of Software Development magazine. His diverse resume also includes: sportswriter for the Los Angeles Daily News, covering NCAA and NBA basketball, television critic for the Palo Alto Times Tribune, and Sports Information Director at Stanford University. He has served as a correspondent for The Associated Press, covering Stanford and NCAA tournament basketball, since 1983. He has covered a number of major events, including the 1984 Democratic National Convention, a Presidential press conference at the White House in 1993, the Emmy Awards (three times), two Rose Bowls, the Fiesta Bowl, several NCAA men's and women's basketball tournaments, a Formula One Grand Prix auto race, a heavyweight boxing championship bout (Ali vs. Spinks, 1978), and the 1985 Super Bowl. A 1975 graduate of Pepperdine University in Malibu, Calif., Chris has won more than a dozen regional and national awards for his work. He and his wife, Rebecca, have four children and reside in Redwood City, Calif.Follow on Twitter: editingwhiz
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...

 
Manage your Newsletters: Login   Register My Newsletters























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rocket Fuel