Protegrity Delivers Database Encryption, Key Management

 
 
By Lisa Vaas  |  Posted 2002-12-23 Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Protegrity Inc. is rolling out security packages for leading databases that combine software with cryptographic hardware to provide enhanced key management capabilities.

Protegrity Inc. is rolling out security packages for leading databases that combine software with cryptographic hardware to provide enhanced key management capabilities.

The Secure.Data F3 package automates encryption and separates duties between database administrators and security officers, enabling centralized management of encryption parameters. It uses NCipher Corporation Ltd.s cryptographic hardware, which is certified to Federal Information Processing Standard 140 Level 3, a benchmark for cryptographic security best practices.

Protegrity, of Stamford, Conn., will announce Secure.Data F3 for Microsoft Corp. SQL Server 2000 early in 2003. A version for Oracle Corp.s Oracle8i is available. Protegrity officials said support for IBM and Sybase Inc. databases is in the works but declined to say when it will be available.

Pete Lindstrom, an analyst at Spire Security LLC, in Malvern, Pa., said the packages address usability and performance, two big problems associated with encryption. Encrypting data within databases is "a ... lot easier said than done," Lindstrom said, not only because of the need to encrypt data in rows, columns and tables but also because data from users with varying levels of access must be encrypted separately.

Protegrity attacks the software part of the problem by providing key management, which typically slows overall database performance. Such a package might help SQL Server users focus more on securing all possible paths to data, as opposed to the typical, intended paths that usually get the attention, Lindstrom said.

 
 
 
 
Lisa Vaas is News Editor/Operations for eWEEK.com and also serves as editor of the Database topic center. Since 1995, she has also been a Webcast news show anchorperson and a reporter covering the IT industry. She has focused on customer relationship management technology, IT salaries and careers, effects of the H1-B visa on the technology workforce, wireless technology, security, and, most recently, databases and the technologies that touch upon them. Her articles have appeared in eWEEK's print edition, on eWEEK.com, and in the startup IT magazine PC Connection. Prior to becoming a journalist, Vaas experienced an array of eye-opening careers, including driving a cab in Boston, photographing cranky babies in shopping malls, selling cameras, typography and computer training. She stopped a hair short of finishing an M.A. in English at the University of Massachusetts in Boston. She earned a B.S. in Communications from Emerson College. She runs two open-mic reading series in Boston and currently keeps bees in her home in Mashpee, Mass.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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