Security: Security Defenses: 10 Ways To Circumvent Threats With a Sound BYOD Policy

 
 
By Chris Preimesberger  |  Posted 2012-06-27 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
As much as the bring-your-own-device-to-work trend pleases CIOs because it means they don't have to buy as many BlackBerrys, laptops and smartphones for employees as they used to, the thought of all those foreign devices inside the firewall terrorizes security managers. Does there need to be a custom security solution for every single device, every version of every device and every person in the company? How problematic might that become? Let's face it: A plethora of mobile devices exist and are brought into the workplace by employees who assume the right to use them—with or without IT's approval. There certainly are pros and cons on this topic. Like anything else, it starts with research, creating company policies and then enforcing them. This eWEEK slide show will help you start the whole process. Our resource for the slide show is Citrix Chief Security Strategist Kurt Roemer, who leads security, compliance, risk and privacy strategy efforts for Citrix products.
 
 
 

Design for Your Fears

Embrace, do not fear, rapidly evolving computing realities. The typical IT design for the cloud considers that the exceptions of yesterday's business world have become the assumptions of today's world. Personal productivity devices in the workplace, combined with the security threats and attack tactics associated with them, must be balanced with the business imperatives for agility, compliance and innovation. By designing for your fears, bring your own computing (BYO) and the cloud achieve the synergistic goal of optimizing productivity and security while empowering both workers and IT. One of the first fears to get over is consumerization.
Design for Your Fears
 
 
 
 
 
Chris Preimesberger Chris Preimesberger was named Editor-in-Chief of Features & Analysis at eWEEK in November 2011. Previously he served eWEEK as Senior Writer, covering a range of IT sectors that include data center systems, cloud computing, storage, virtualization, green IT, e-discovery and IT governance. His blog, Storage Station, is considered a go-to information source. Chris won a national Folio Award for magazine writing in November 2011 for a cover story on Salesforce.com and CEO-founder Marc Benioff, and he has served as a judge for the SIIA Codie Awards since 2005. In previous IT journalism, Chris was a founding editor of both IT Manager's Journal and DevX.com and was managing editor of Software Development magazine. His diverse resume also includes: sportswriter for the Los Angeles Daily News, covering NCAA and NBA basketball, television critic for the Palo Alto Times Tribune, and Sports Information Director at Stanford University. He has served as a correspondent for The Associated Press, covering Stanford and NCAA tournament basketball, since 1983. He has covered a number of major events, including the 1984 Democratic National Convention, a Presidential press conference at the White House in 1993, the Emmy Awards (three times), two Rose Bowls, the Fiesta Bowl, several NCAA men's and women's basketball tournaments, a Formula One Grand Prix auto race, a heavyweight boxing championship bout (Ali vs. Spinks, 1978), and the 1985 Super Bowl. A 1975 graduate of Pepperdine University in Malibu, Calif., Chris has won more than a dozen regional and national awards for his work. He and his wife, Rebecca, have four children and reside in Redwood City, Calif.Follow on Twitter: editingwhiz
 
 
 
 
 
 

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