VOIP Community Looks to Interoperability

 
 
By Ellen Muraskin  |  Posted 2004-09-27 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

As chip, software and hardware makers build their IP PBXes, phones, carrier softswitches, media gateways and application servers, how do they ensure that they support calls consistently?

The challenge gathering critical mass over the VOIP landscape concerns interoperability. As chip, software and hardware makers build their IP PBXes, phones, terminal adapters, carrier softswitches, media gateways and application servers, how do they ensure that they support calls consistently? The goal is to send calls, as the PSTN does, from enterprise to network to enterprise, or from network to consumer subscriber, or network to network, without dropping connections, exposing vulnerabilities, and ideally, without having to gateway out to the PSTN and back again when traversing VOIP carriers. Indeed, September has seen a rash of interoperability announcements, ranging from successful inter-vendor tests to vendor-sponsored and independent-lab testing programs. Carrier Level 3 Communications Inc. announced a SIP interop testing initiative back in May, called (3)VoIP TAP (Technology Alliance Partners). Its aim: getting call centers, conferencing companies and hardware vendors to verify that their VoIP implementations work with Level 3s IP-based softswitch platform and VoIP services. On SepT. 20, CT Labs, an independent testing facility with a long history in computer telephony, announced a fee-based Interoperability Testing Program for manufacturers of IP switch platforms, aimed at verifying their compatibility with a range of IP phones, softphones, PDA phone clients, and wireless IP phones. And on Sept 22, AT&T weighed in with its own interop program, to see if hardware and software makers were on speaking terms with its own VOIP implementations.
Read about the AT&T announcement in Newsfactor Network.
 
 
 
 
Ellen Muraskin is editor of eWEEK.com's VOIP & Telephony Center. She has worked on the editorial staff at Computer Telephony, since renamed Communications Convergence, including three years as executive editor. Muraskin's work has also appeared in Popular Science magazine and other publications.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...

 
Manage your Newsletters: Login   Register My Newsletters























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rocket Fuel