Virtual Server Under Way

 
 
By Timothy Dyck  |  Posted 2003-06-16 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Virtualization and other mechanisms of server partitioning are growing increasingly common on x86-based servers, and Microsoft will enter the game at year's end, when it expects to ship its first server virtualization product.

Virtualization and other mechanisms of server partitioning are growing increasingly common on x86-based servers, and Microsoft will enter the game at years end, when it expects to ship its first server virtualization product.

The company is testing a prebeta release of the upcoming Microsoft Virtual Server (a product based on technology gained through Microsofts purchase of Connectix in February). It supports Windows 2000 Server or Windows Server 2003 as host operating systems. Pricing and packaging details havent been announced yet.

During tests, Virtual Server demonstrated some compelling capabilities, particularly in the remote access department as its client/server design provides what is essentially TCP/IP-based KVM controller functionality. Virtual machines are created and managed through a Web client interface (see screen, above).

All running virtual machines are shown on the administrative tools Web page as well, along with accompanying statistics on host machine utilization. I was pleasantly surprised to note that I could control the minimum and maximum CPU percentage of the host CPU capacity that each virtual machine was allocated for its use.

Virtual Server has strong remote access features. I remotely controlled virtual machines using the popular remote control package Virtual Network Computing or Virtual Servers Internet Explorer 5.5- or 6.0-based interface (which uses a downloadable ActiveX control). Virtual Server also includes a non-browser-based remote access client application. Im happy to see such an open approach to remote virtual machine access.

 
 
 
 
Timothy Dyck is a Senior Analyst with eWEEK Labs. He has been testing and reviewing application server, database and middleware products and technologies for eWEEK since 1996. Prior to joining eWEEK, he worked at the LAN and WAN network operations center for a large telecommunications firm, in operating systems and development tools technical marketing for a large software company and in the IT department at a government agency. He has an honors bachelors degree of mathematics in computer science from the University of Waterloo in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, and a masters of arts degree in journalism from the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario, Canada.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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