Confidela Releases WatchDox Pro and WatchDox Business

 
 
By Nicholas Kolakowski  |  Posted 2009-08-10 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Confidela is offering two additions to its WatchDox line that give individuals and businesses greater control over the documents they send. Offered as a software-as-a-service solution, WatchDox now allows users to prevent images of their on-screen documents from being taken via camera or cell phone, and seamlessly upgrades previously sent documents to the latest version.

Confidela has released WatchDox Pro and WatchDox Business, two updated applications for software-as-a-service, or SAAS, document control, tracking and protection.

The WatchDox application allows users to set controls for a document, such as an expiration date or a request to track whether the recipient views, prints or forwards the document in question onto someone else. Once uploaded via HTTPS, the document is converted into a WatchDox format and e-mailed onto the recipient.

New features to WatchDox Pro and WatchDox Business include "Spotlight," designed to prevent on-screen images of sensitive documents from being captured via a camera or cell phone. Simply put, the application layers a series of tiny opaque bars across the screen; placing a cursor over a particular section will remove the bars, allowing only that portion to be read.

Another feature allows users to update versions of previously sent documents, ensuring that the recipients have the latest version. Tweaks to the program also allow for more seamless document conversion to Flash format.

WatchDox Pro is being marketed toward individuals, at a subscription rate of $14.95 per month, while WatchDox Business is a multiple-license application that costs $29.95 per month per user.

Glitches and security in document transmission have been small but steady issues for companies that offer SAAS to individuals and businesses. In March, Google reported that it had eliminated a bug that led to the inadvertent sharing of Google Docs documents, an issue that the company claimed affected less than 0.05 percent of all such documents.


 
 
 
 
Nicholas Kolakowski is a staff editor at eWEEK, covering Microsoft and other companies in the enterprise space, as well as evolving technology such as tablet PCs. His work has appeared in The Washington Post, Playboy, WebMD, AARP the Magazine, AutoWeek, Washington City Paper, Trader Monthly, and Private Air. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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