Google Chrome Is a Lock for 10% Share, but How Much More?

 
 
By Clint Boulton  |  Posted 2009-09-20 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Google Chrome could easily reach 10 percent market share by 2011, but it could do more than that by being bundled with PCs by Sony, HP, Dell and Lenovo. Every analyst eWEEK polled said that while the Sony deal gives Google a toehold in PC bundling, it isn't enough for Google and high-tech watchers to get excited over. PC manufacturers, which have nothing but dumb boxes of metal, plastic and silicon without an OS to support them, could fear spurning Microsoft by going with Chrome.

Google's Chrome Web browser is generating heady excitement these days, particularly after the search and Web services giant Sept. 15 put Chrome 3.0 into stable release.

Net Applications said Chrome cultivated 2.84 percent worldwide market share through August, hardly burning up the browser market versus Microsoft Internet Explorer and Mozilla Firefox.

But that's nearly 3 percent through one year of life, which is why Chrome Engineering Director Linus Upson told Reuters recently that he would be "exceptionally disappointed" if Chrome didn't command 10 percent of the browser market after three years. Check back in September 2011.

The question is whether Upson's wishful estimate is, well, so wishful. Sony is currently offering Chrome as an alternative to IE on Vaio computers, so doesn't it stand to reason that Google may realize more growth for Chrome than an organic growth of 3 percent per year?

PC market share statistics from researcher Gartner, however, show Sony has a paltry 1.5 percent market share, selling only 1,039,742 computers in the second quarter this year.

Suppose Sony sells another million computers in the current quarter, and let's say half those users opt to go with Chrome over IE or even installing Firefox. That's 500,000 new Chrome users for the quarter. Average that out for a full year, and that's 2 million new users per year and close to 6 million by Chrome's third birthday in 2011.     

Every analyst eWEEK polled said that while the Sony deal gives Google a toehold in PC bundling, it isn't enough for Google and high-tech watchers to get excited over. IDC analyst Al Hilwa called Sony's bundling of Chrome more of moral victory than a substantive one at this stage.

"It is certainly a milestone, and it is exactly what Google needs to do to get the penetration of Chrome up, namely build alliances and OEM preinstallation deals," Hilwa said. "I would expect more such deals in the future. If Google is to achieve 10 percent share by 2011, they would have to strike some serious alliances with the top PC makers as well as offer some differentiated capabilities that can reach the masses."



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...
 
Manage your Newsletters: Login   Register My Newsletters























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rocket Fuel