Google TV Getting on Just Fine in YouTube

 
 
By Clint Boulton  |  Posted 2010-10-31 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Rumors of Google TV's demise are greatly exaggerated, even though the service is not without its flaws and imperfections. Expect it to get better over time.

News Analysis: Just a few short days ago, the sky appeared to be falling on Google TV, the Web and channel-surfing hybrid service based on Google's Android operating system and accessed by Google's Chrome Web browser.

First, the majority of reviews throughout the week have been downcast, with many testers proclaiming Google TV unpolished, buggy or downright inaccessible from some Websites.

Then came this report from the San Francisco Chronicle with a headline that originally proclaimed Google TV "troubled" and shunted off to YouTube, presumably to wither and die.

Citing what are no doubt TV industry curmudgeons troubled by Google TV, the Chronicle attributed the move to "negative reaction to the new Internet television service among major media companies."

Television networks ABC, CBS and NBC are shielding programming on their Websites from Google TV, concerned that the service does not adequately protect their programming from piracy.

However, a Google spokesperson told eWEEK there is no correlation between ABC, CBS and NBC blocking Google TV users from accessing their full-length Web shows and Google TV's migration to YouTube, which was reorganized Sept. 17.

Google TV's move to YouTube happened quietly after the reorg, but before the service launched on Logitech Revue and Sony Internet TVs and Blu-ray players within the last two weeks.

A Google spokesperson told eWEEK Google TV has always reported into YouTube -- and its reporting structure has remained largely unchanged.

"Just like any rapidly growing organization, it is important for YouTube to evolve and grow to ensure further success in the future," the Google spokesperson said.

And it looks like part of that future success involves Google TV. Some might see this as a failure for Google TV, that it needs a strong business unit responsible for Google's $2.5 billion run-rate in display ad sales.

It's not a banishment, but a sign that Google is looking to extend YouTube as a real broadcast medium with unpolished and professional content alike. Others are finding the same.

The YouTube reorg included the creation of a group focused on partnerships with content creators, led by former Google TV alumnus Dean Gilbert.



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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