Not Everyone Is Bullish on Google TV

 
 
By Clint Boulton  |  Posted 2010-06-10 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Users will upload, access and share links, videos and photos from Facebook, MySpace and Twitter and share YouTube videos with their friends on a larger screen.

Martis said these applications will work on Google TV and like services because the marketplace and consumer expectations of what can be done with user-generated content have matured over the years.

He also said mainstream smartphone applications for gaming and social networking are relevant to the TV viewing experience. What plays well on a smartphone will play well on a TV set, he argued. Moreover, Google is upgrading its Android SDK (software development kit) to accommodate applications tailored for Google TV, but not until after the service goes live in fall 2010.

Martis' bullish comments come as his team is working hard to help bring Google TV devices to shelves at Best Buy. Not everyone shares Martis' enthusiasm for Google TV, however.

Apple CEO Steve Jobs knocked Google TV and such services at the D8 conference the week of May 31, arguing that consumers don't want to stick another box or more remotes on their TVs and coffee tables.

Industry analysts have also expressed skepticism about Web TV, noting that Google didn't appear to have acquired much support from cable TV and broadband providers. Satellite provider Dish Network is currently the lone supporter in that realm.

Martis meanwhile candidly acknowledged Intel's failures with Web TV and Viiv.

Web TV failed a decade ago because it lacked the technological infrastructure, such as high-speed bandwidth and high-resolution displays to support it. Viiv, he said, had the right technology but neither the content nor the business model needed to capitalize on it.

"It seems the business model was always a coming attraction in a future episode," Martis said, his keynote speech laced with TV puns. "If our industry were a TV show we wouldn't have been picked up for another season."

However, Intel never abandoned the market and the chip maker learned a lot from each step and misstep it made along the path, he said.



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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