Move Over, EAI

 
 
By Darryl K. Taft  |  Posted 2004-11-22 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Web services continue making headway in the enterprise, particularly as integration solutions, where many believe Web services will lead to cost savings and efficiencies over older, more established technologies such as EAI.

Web services continue making headway in the enterprise, particularly as integration solutions, where many believe Web services will lead to cost savings and efficiencies over older, more established technologies such as EAI.

An Evans Data Corp. survey released earlier this month reported that 40 percent of the developers surveyed said they believe Web services will reduce the need for enterprise application integration. Sixty percent said they believe Web services can significantly or somewhat lower the costs of EAI systems, said the Santa Cruz, Calif., companys survey.

The trend isnt stopping such companies as Iona Technologies Inc., of Waltham, Mass., one of the last traditional EAI vendors. It recently signed a deal with Deutsche Post AG on what is said to be one of the largest integration projects in the world.

Deutsche Post, over the past two years, acquired DHL International Ltd. and Airborne Express Inc. and must integrate the companies IT systems. It is building an SOA (service-oriented architecture) using Ionas Artix ESB (Enterprise Service Bus) as the core. Iona officials said traditional EAI is not the only solution for integration projects, but the company is preserving its EAI roots.

Click here to read about advances in Tibcos EAI wares. Eric Newcomer, Ionas chief technology officer, said the traditional EAI is moving to SOAs. "I would add that the ability to deploy and manage integration capacity at the endpoints, rather than within the hub, is a big reason why," Newcomer said.

Deutsche Posts SOP (Service Oriented Platform) Group has teamed with Iona to build Artix into the organizations Service BackBone, which is the latest version of Deutsche Posts 5-year-old SOA program, said officials for the Bonn, Germany, company.

Michael Herr, senior director of IT and the head of SOP at Deutsche Post, said his group evaluated more pure Web services solutions, but they would not have fit the companys needs as well as Artix.

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Darryl K. Taft covers the development tools and developer-related issues beat from his office in Baltimore. He has more than 10 years of experience in the business and is always looking for the next scoop. Taft is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and was named 'one of the most active middleware reporters in the world' by The Middleware Co. He also has his own card in the 'Who's Who in Enterprise Java' deck.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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