Mozilla Still Good After 32 Days

 
 
By Timothy Dyck  |  Posted 2002-07-26 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

eLABorations: New browser could teach IE a thing or two—including tabbed browsing and pop-up-window blocking.

Ive been using Mozilla [www.mozilla.org] full-time for 32 days now after years on Internet Explorer. At first, it was just to test out the software for work, but Ive now installed it on my personal systems and dont plan on going back. Here are the pros and cons Ive found so far (I went directly to Mozilla 1.1 Alpha and am now running 1.1 Beta). First, there are two things Mozilla does better than IE, and both are compelling enough to me to make the switch: tabbed browsing and pop-up-window blocking.
Tabs are beautiful, beautiful things. I often have 30 or more browser windows open for days as I research several stories in parallel. Now I have four or five Mozilla windows open, each devoted to one particular topic, and each with several tabs open. This really suits the way I work. This was an Opera invention, but theyre well done in Mozilla.
With KDEs Konqueror getting tabs in Version 3.1, IE is the only big browser left without them (there are third-party additions for IE, such as Stilesoft Inc.s NetCaptor [www.netcaptor.com], that add tabs to IE, but it isnt part of the main product). One small thing Id like with tabs is the ability to reorder them left-to-right in order to group them logically before saving a group of tabs to a bookmark. Mozilla also does a great job at pop-up-window blocking (to turn this on, see Edit, Preferences, Advanced, Scripts & Plugins, and then uncheck the top five options). I feel like Im in control of my browsing again. This is a truly user-friendly feature.
Second, Mozilla had to be at least as good as IE in a few key areas—speed, stability, compatibility, Google integration and bookmark handling—in order to allow me to switch. The speed is quite decent. Mozillas start time feels as fast as IEs (I was surprised at this, since IE is so hooked into Windows) and browsing is fast, too. Its not as fast as Opera, but its good enough for me. Stability (especially since Im running Alpha and then Beta code) is acceptable. Ive had four or five crashes overall. The crash dump reporting tools present in both IE and Mozilla give me hope that every time I do have a crash, the bug that tripped me up has a real chance of getting fixed. The vast majority of sites Ive visited do just fine on Mozilla. I have noticed a few places where two objects overlap each other (see example ) and have had some problems with sites that use Windows Media streaming video, but Flash and QuickTime plug-ins work fine. The Google search toolbar plug-in is only for IE, but Mozilla has built-in search features that support Google. Both Mozilla and IE also support bookmark keywords that let me create a custom Google bookmark so I can type "g (search string)" into the URL bar to do a search. (See advanced Mozilla bookmark tricks.)


 
 
 
 
Timothy Dyck is a Senior Analyst with eWEEK Labs. He has been testing and reviewing application server, database and middleware products and technologies for eWEEK since 1996. Prior to joining eWEEK, he worked at the LAN and WAN network operations center for a large telecommunications firm, in operating systems and development tools technical marketing for a large software company and in the IT department at a government agency. He has an honors bachelors degree of mathematics in computer science from the University of Waterloo in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, and a masters of arts degree in journalism from the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario, Canada.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...
 
Manage your Newsletters: Login   Register My Newsletters























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thanks for your registration, follow us on our social networks to keep up-to-date
Rocket Fuel