Who Knew Microsoft Still Had It in for IBM?

 
 
By Darryl K. Taft  |  Posted 2009-05-04 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Microsoft is taking on IBM with claims that IBM's WebSphere runs faster, better and more cheaply on Windows Server 2008. Software giant Microsoft is calling IBM out for a showdown to see which platform is optimal for WebSphere in a campaign that asks, Who Knew?

Microsoft has launched a new site that asks, "Who Knew?" as part of an aggressive campaign to paint Windows as the optimal platform for enterprise middleware and applications, particularly IBM's WebSphere application server.

The site, www.websphereloveswindows.com, includes benchmark data to the effect that WebSphere runs more efficiently and less expensively on Windows Server 2008 and WinTel hardware than onf Unix and IBM Power systems.

The "Who Knew?" site features case studies and white papers describing the use of WebSphere on Windows Server in various situations. Key findings of one highlighted benchmark showed:

??Ç   Customers can save up to 81% in total system costs by running applications on Microsoft .NET and Windows Server 2008 rather than IBM WebSphere 7 on Power6/AIX.

??Ç   Customers who run their IBM WebSphere 7 applications on Windows Server 2008 and Intel Xeon 5400 processor-based HP BladeSystem servers can save up to 66% in total system costs when compared to running the same applications on IBM WebSphere 7 on an IBM Power6/AIX platform.

??Ç   In examining performance, the Microsoft .NET Framework on Windows Server 2008 handles 57% more load than WebSphere 7 running on IBM Power6/AIX, and IBM WebSphere 7 on Windows Server 2008 handles 37% more load than IBM WebSphere 7 running on Power6.

In a blog post, Steven Martin, Microsoft senior director of developer platform product management, said:

About a year ago, I blogged about some .NET/Windows Server benchmark testing results produced by Greg Leake. After taking some well deserved time off, Greg went back to the lab, expanded his testing and agreed to help get to the bottom of the 'back office' debate. For the first time, the results include IBM hardware (POWER6) which allows us to evaluate price/performance using typical customer configurations. In an era of cost cutting and the need to squeeze as much optimization out of systems as possible, we think customers will find this information very interesting.

Let's start with costs... Greg's findings demonstrate that customers save up to 81% in total system costs by running applications on Microsoft .NET and Windows Server 2008 vs. IBM WebSphere 7 on POWER6/AIX. The study also showed that customers who run their IBM WebSphere 7 applications on Windows Server 2008 and Hewlett Packard/Intel 64-bit blade servers can save up to 66% in total system costs when compared to running the same applications on IBM WebSphere 7 on an IBM Power6/AIX platform. These results illuminate significant savings for businesses of all sizes, and particularly speak to the value of the Windows Server platform. Our hope is that people are able to make use of these findings to get more for their money, either by making new investments or by maximizing assets they are already using. Who knew WebSphere and Windows Server were such a match?

The new focus on IBM and WebSphere comes on the heels of equally if not more aggressive tactics Microsoft has leveled against Apple with its "I'm a PC" campaign and its Apple Tax campaign. The WebSphere focus represents a new enterprise installment of the company's onslaught against its competition.

"I'm amazed with the price point IBM commands for both software and hardware given these results. It's time for them to wake up and smell the economy," Martin told eWEEK.

In an InternetNews report, an IBM spokesperson said the company is "amused" by Microsoft's claims.

In response to that statement, Microsoft's Martin followed up with another blog post issuing a challenge to IBM.

Martin said, "I know you are just as interested in saving customers money and improving performance as we are, which is why our recent tests caught your eye. To demonstrate my confidence in the numbers we have produced, I'd like to propose having a third party rerun the benchmark tests and publish the results. To make it easy, I'll put my money where my mouth is and fund it. Are you in?" 

 
 
 
 
Darryl K. Taft covers the development tools and developer-related issues beat from his office in Baltimore. He has more than 10 years of experience in the business and is always looking for the next scoop. Taft is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and was named 'one of the most active middleware reporters in the world' by The Middleware Co. He also has his own card in the 'Who's Who in Enterprise Java' deck.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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