Sun, AMD Land Their Largest Supercomputer Deal

 
 
By Chris Preimesberger  |  Posted 2005-11-15 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Sun will deliver an AMD-powered, grid-based megasystem that will become Japan's largest supercomputer.

Sun Microsystems Inc. announced the largest high-performance computing deal in its 23-year history Tuesday with an AMD-powered, grid-based megasystem it will deliver for deployment next spring to the Tokyo Institute of Technology. The project ultimately will become Japans largest supercomputer, surpassing that nations Earth Simulator Center in Yokohama, which only a year ago was clocked as the worlds fastest computer. Earth Simulator fell to No. 7 in the November 2005 Top 500 Supercomputer Sites listing, released Monday on the independent Top500.org Web site.
Tuesdays announcement was made at the Supercomputing 2005 Conference in Seattle.
A Sun spokesperson declined to say how much the deal will mean financially to the Santa Clara, Calif.-based company. The new system, which has been in the works for about a year, is based on Sun architecture, Sun Fire x86, 64-bit (now called x64 within the industry) servers with 10,480 AMD Opteron processor cores, totaling more than 50 trillion floating point operations per second (teraFLOPS). The huge computer also includes Sun and NEC storage technologies and NECs integration expertise as well as ClearSpeeds Advance accelerator boards. Sun plans incremental increases in performance to beyond 100 teraflops with installation of additional ClearSpeed boards (initially from 360 to more than 600) by the time of the systems operation in 2006, the company said.
Using Suns N1 System Manager and N1 Grid Engine, the system will be provisioned to support the Solaris 10 operating system as well as Linux, the company said. Grid computing is the application of the resources of many computers within a network to solve a scientific or technical problem that requires a great number of computer processing cycles or access to large amounts of data. "Every student at the Tokyo Institute will have access to this computer when it is finished," said Marc Hamilton, Sun director of Technology, Global Education and Research. Hamilton is supervising the architecture for the project. "Whats unique about this project is that itll be the largest clustered system ever built, and its using some cutting-edge technologies that are as yet unannounced by Sun," Hamilton said. "Well have 10,480 dual-core AMD processors with the fewest number of interconnects possible, plus 1.1PB [petabytes] of storage [a unit of information or computer storage equal to 1,000TB, or 1 quadrillion bytes]." The worlds current fastest computer, the Department of Energys IBM BlueGene/L system in Livermore, Calif., is not considered a "clustered" computer system, because "it has IBMs proprietary interconnects, therefore it is really all one system," Hamilton said. Click here to read more about the BlueGene/L system. "Right now, if this computer were up and running [at optimum levels], it would be the third-fastest on the [world] list," Hamilton said. Hamilton said that a team of 60 developers have been working on the project for about a year. "Tokyo Techs system will be leveraged by a wide range of researchers within the university and throughout the world," said Satoshi Matsuoka, professor in charge of Research Infrastructure at Global Scientific Information and Computing Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology. "These researchers are tackling complex problems ranging from analyzing the complex molecular structure of proteins, simulated blood flow diagnosis in human brains, modeling of the generation mechanism of Earth and planetary magnetic field and their long-term effects, to nanoscience simulation of carbon nanotubes—all tasks that require exceptional computing power and experience working with supercomputers," Matsuoka said. Charles King, chief analyst at Hayward, Calif.-based Pund-IT Inc., told Ziff Davis Internet that "this is a good place for Sun to be right now. I was pleasantly surprised to hear about this [supercomputing] deal. Sun obviously needs all the good news it can get, and this is good news, indeed, for them." King said that "back in the late 90s and up through about 2001, Sun was heavily represented in the Top 500 supercomputer listings. I think they only have one system on the list now, so theyve been shut out. But thats going to change as time goes on. This [Sun-AMD-Tokyo Tech] new supercomputer deal really validates Suns partnership with AMD." Sun has been on hot streak of late, landing its largest grid-computing deal only a week ago—an agreement with high-performance computing service provider Virtual Compute Corp. to use more than 1 million hours of CPUs on the Sun Grid Compute Utility during the next several months. Check out eWEEK.coms for the latest news, views and analysis on servers, switches and networking protocols for the enterprise and small businesses.
 
 
 
 
Chris Preimesberger Chris Preimesberger was named Editor-in-Chief of Features & Analysis at eWEEK in November 2011. Previously he served eWEEK as Senior Writer, covering a range of IT sectors that include data center systems, cloud computing, storage, virtualization, green IT, e-discovery and IT governance. His blog, Storage Station, is considered a go-to information source. Chris won a national Folio Award for magazine writing in November 2011 for a cover story on Salesforce.com and CEO-founder Marc Benioff, and he has served as a judge for the SIIA Codie Awards since 2005. In previous IT journalism, Chris was a founding editor of both IT Manager's Journal and DevX.com and was managing editor of Software Development magazine. His diverse resume also includes: sportswriter for the Los Angeles Daily News, covering NCAA and NBA basketball, television critic for the Palo Alto Times Tribune, and Sports Information Director at Stanford University. He has served as a correspondent for The Associated Press, covering Stanford and NCAA tournament basketball, since 1983. He has covered a number of major events, including the 1984 Democratic National Convention, a Presidential press conference at the White House in 1993, the Emmy Awards (three times), two Rose Bowls, the Fiesta Bowl, several NCAA men's and women's basketball tournaments, a Formula One Grand Prix auto race, a heavyweight boxing championship bout (Ali vs. Spinks, 1978), and the 1985 Super Bowl. A 1975 graduate of Pepperdine University in Malibu, Calif., Chris has won more than a dozen regional and national awards for his work. He and his wife, Rebecca, have four children and reside in Redwood City, Calif.Follow on Twitter: editingwhiz
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...
 
Manage your Newsletters: Login   Register My Newsletters























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thanks for your registration, follow us on our social networks to keep up-to-date
Rocket Fuel