Why Storage Automation Will Be a Hot Topic in 2009

 
 
By Chris Preimesberger  |  Posted 2008-12-17 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Storage companies are finding ways to automate processes that used to be painstaking, tedious and expensive to handle. For example, storage tiering and change management priorities can now be dialed up from anywhere in the world on Web-based central consoles supplied by a rapidly growing number of vendors.

If there's one word that spells out a major data storage trend for 2009, it's "automation." In its simplest form, we're talking about the creative intersection of business intelligence, botlike software and data storage arrays.

Storage companies are finding ways to automate processes that used to be painstaking, tedious and expensive to handle. For example, storage tiering and change management priorities can now be dialed up from anywhere in the world on central, Web-based consoles supplied by a rapidly growing number of vendors.

Storage tiering keeps often-accessed data on a fast Tier 1 spinning or solid-state disk, by far the most power-hungry option; Tier 2 data, accessed less frequently, is kept on slower, cheaper SATA (Serial ATA) disks. Tier 3 is tape storage for data that may never see the light of day again.

Intelligent software in the data center is doing more of the heavy-and often very intricate-lifting. Old-school manual labor, where IT staff met once or twice a month to physically print out all the application patches and security updates on spreadsheets and walk them out to production locations, is finis.

The process of creating storage access and security policies also has been speeded up, with wizards and drop-down menus becoming commonplace. Templates are popping up everywhere. Administrative jobs are getting done in minutes that used to take hours or days.

On the operations side, data centers are being kept cooler with less electrical draw by automated variable-speed fans and pumps. These are replacing traditional CRAC (computer room air conditioning) and CRAH (computer room air handling) units with fans that run at a single speed. In this way, when a section of server racks is cool enough, the fans automatically slow down to save energy; conversely, when the racks need more cooling, they speed up.

This all adds up. A reduction of 10 percent in fan speed yields an approximately 27 percent reduction in a fan's electrical use, and a 20 percent reduction in speed yields electrical savings of approximately 49 percent.

Automated features are trickling down from HPC shops

These are the advantages high-performance computing shops have enjoyed for years. Now those features are finding their way into most enterprise systems-and even some small and midsize business systems.

"Systems are becoming a lot more intelligent, quicker to adapt to changes in the environment," Willy Chiu, IBM's vice president of High Performance On Demand Solutions, told me. "You start off with these traditional processes-we call them BSS (business services) and OSS (operations services). Those will be automated, and they will leverage these cloud [storage] computing infrastructures and will provide more links to your business processes.

"IT becomes a much more intelligent organization, smarter about the environment you're in; therefore, you can leverage it to drive your businesses across this new environment."



 
 
 
 
Chris Preimesberger Chris Preimesberger was named Editor-in-Chief of Features & Analysis at eWEEK in November 2011. Previously he served eWEEK as Senior Writer, covering a range of IT sectors that include data center systems, cloud computing, storage, virtualization, green IT, e-discovery and IT governance. His blog, Storage Station, is considered a go-to information source. Chris won a national Folio Award for magazine writing in November 2011 for a cover story on Salesforce.com and CEO-founder Marc Benioff, and he has served as a judge for the SIIA Codie Awards since 2005. In previous IT journalism, Chris was a founding editor of both IT Manager's Journal and DevX.com and was managing editor of Software Development magazine. His diverse resume also includes: sportswriter for the Los Angeles Daily News, covering NCAA and NBA basketball, television critic for the Palo Alto Times Tribune, and Sports Information Director at Stanford University. He has served as a correspondent for The Associated Press, covering Stanford and NCAA tournament basketball, since 1983. He has covered a number of major events, including the 1984 Democratic National Convention, a Presidential press conference at the White House in 1993, the Emmy Awards (three times), two Rose Bowls, the Fiesta Bowl, several NCAA men's and women's basketball tournaments, a Formula One Grand Prix auto race, a heavyweight boxing championship bout (Ali vs. Spinks, 1978), and the 1985 Super Bowl. A 1975 graduate of Pepperdine University in Malibu, Calif., Chris has won more than a dozen regional and national awards for his work. He and his wife, Rebecca, have four children and reside in Redwood City, Calif.Follow on Twitter: editingwhiz
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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