IBM to Couple AT&T's Managed App, Hosting Services With Its Cloud

Today's topics include IBM taking on AT&T managed services in an expansion of their business partnership, Google found itself leaning on Microsoft last week for its Angular 2 launch, Microsoft expresses regret for no longer offering unlimited cloud storage, and a security researcher reveals major Instagram flaws to Facebook.

IBM and AT&T announced an expansion of their long-term strategic relationship to bring businesses a full suite of networking, application and hosting services.

Under the agreement, AT&T will transition its managed application and managed hosting services unit to IBM. IBM will then align these managed service capabilities with its IBM Cloud portfolio. IBM will also acquire equipment and access to floor space in AT&T data centers currently supporting the applications and managed hosting operations.

When Google introduced the beta of its Angular 2 JavaScript development framework last week, it did so with the help of more than 1,300 contributors, one of which was an unlikely partner, Microsoft.

Google wrote Angular 2 in TypeScript—Microsoft's superset of JavaScript. The Angular engineering team also used Microsoft's Visual Studio Code editor, which is now in beta. Visual Studio Code is a code editor redefined and optimized for building and debugging modern Web and cloud applications.

Last month, Microsoft announced that it would stop offering unlimited OneDrive cloud storage to customers with Office 365 consumer and University plans. Now, Microsoft is voicing its regret for not being able to deliver the perk to all corporate customers.

In an announcement released on Dec. 16 by Microsoft's Vice President for OneDrive and SharePoint, Jeff Teper apologized to customers who expected unlimited storage across every Office 365 plan.

In a public spat, security researcher Wesley Wineberg posted an extended rant about a vulnerability he reported to Facebook regarding remote code execution flaws with Instagram.

Facebook acknowledged Wineberg's initial report, for which he was awarded $2,500 on Nov. 16. Wineberg also alleges that he found other issues that allowed broad access to Instagram. This included Amazon API keys that he used to gain access to an Amazon S3 storage bucket which contained Instagram technical and system data.

However, Facebook's Chief Security Officer Alex Stamos claims that is expected behavior and would not be considered a security flaw.

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