Open Source Codecs Pave Way for High-Resolution Streaming Video - Page 2

The AV1 code is not quite finished but is due to be frozen late this year. One company, Bitmovin, has already productized an early version of AV1, which was demonstrated at this year’s NAB and won a Best in Show prize.

Open Source Codecs Not for Everybody

Given the performance and free-use license of the VP9 and AV1 codecs, it would seem a no-brainer for all video producers to embrace the new formats. But there are still many holdouts, which has more to do with culture wars in broadcasting than in technology. Many broadcasters, for instance, feel much more comfortable with industry-approved standards that are good enough and don’t change that often.

But the speed of innovation and open source development waits for no standard, said Frost. “There is an increasing openness to working together on developing codecs that can be rapidly implemented with license terms that are easy to understand,” Frost said.

“It makes sense to cooperate to develop those technologies quickly so we can all then build products and services that benefit from them,” he added. “We achieve with this rapid innovation by breaking free of the traditional standards process which involves quarterly meetings at sites around the globe and that pulls engineers who are involved in this process away from their teams and their desks for well over a month of the year for travel time and meeting time.”

Netflix is a recent and aggressive convert to VP9, Frost said. It has now begun using VP9 for mobile, lower-resolution content and downloadable content. Netflix also has said it will be a “very early adopter of AV1” across its services as soon as it is finalized, Frost said. 

Of key importance is using VP9 and AV1 to enable content to reach consumers where phones and internet connectivity is poor. “It’s in emerging markets where users suffer from severe bandwidth constraints and are getting really marginal YouTube experiences where we see the most profound effects [of VP9],” Frost said.

“In those areas where we are seeing the next billion users come online and in emerging markets like Brazil, India and Indonesia we're seeing 10s of percentage points in increase of watch time with YouTube video in VP9 compared with 264.”

Scot Petersen is a technology analyst at Ziff Brothers Investments, a private investment firm. He has an extensive background in the technology field. Prior to joining Ziff Brothers, Scot was the editorial director, Business Applications & Architecture, at TechTarget. Before that, he was the director, Editorial Operations, at Ziff Davis Enterprise. While at Ziff Davis Media, he was a writer and editor at eWEEK. No investment advice is offered in his blog. All duties are disclaimed. Scot works for a private investment firm, which may at any time invest in companies whose products are discussed in this blog, and no disclosure of securities transactions will be made.

Scot Petersen

Scot Petersen

Scot Petersen is a technology analyst at Ziff Brothers Investments, a private investment firm. Prior to joining Ziff Brothers, Scot was the editorial director, Business Applications & Architecture,...