IT Infrastructure: IBM's New Mainframe: 10 Reasons Why the zEnterprise EC12 Rocks

 
 
By Darryl K. Taft  |  Posted 2012-08-28 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IBM has rolled out a new mainframe system, the zEnterprise EC12 mainframe server. Big Blue calls its new mainframe the most powerful and technologically advanced version of an IBM system that has been the linchpin of enterprise computing for 48 years. The new enterprise system, unveiled Aug. 28, features technologies that demonstrate IBM's ongoing commitment to meet the growing need to secure and manage critical information with the System z mainframe, David Balog, IBM's general manager for System z, told eWEEK. "The new system has 25 percent more performance and 50 percent more capacity than its predecessor," he said. The IBM zEC12 enterprise system is the result of an investment by IBM Systems and Technology Group (STG) of more than $1 billion in research and development, primarily in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., as well as 17 other IBM labs around the world and in collaboration with some of IBM's top clients, Balog said. The new IBM mainframe is one of the most secure enterprise systems ever, with built-in security features designed to meet the security and compliance requirements of different industries, he said. With operational analytics and near-real-time workload monitoring and analysis, clients can use the new zEC12 for a variety of workloads leveraging the world's fastest chip running at 5.5 GHz, IBM said. This slide show looks at 10 key features of the new system.
 
 
 

Cryptographic Support

zEC12 includes a state-of-the-art, tamper-resistant cryptographic coprocessor called Crypto Express4S, which provides privacy for transactions and sensitive data. Crypto Express4S includes new firmware developed with IBM Research to meet the security requirements of different industries and geographies. For example, it can be configured to provide support for high-quality digital signatures used with applications for Smart passports, national ID cards and online legal proceedings, replacing handwritten signatures as directed by the European Union and the public sector.
Cryptographic Support
 
 
 
 
 
Darryl K. Taft covers the development tools and developer-related issues beat from his office in Baltimore. He has more than 10 years of experience in the business and is always looking for the next scoop. Taft is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and was named 'one of the most active middleware reporters in the world' by The Middleware Co. He also has his own card in the 'Who's Who in Enterprise Java' deck.
 
 
 
 
 
 

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