6 Reasons Enterprise Collaboration Fails and What to Do About It

 
 
By Darryl K. Taft  |  Posted 2016-08-18
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • Previous
    1 - 6 Reasons Enterprise Collaboration Fails and What to Do About It
    Next

    6 Reasons Enterprise Collaboration Fails and What to Do About It

    Business collaboration solutions are plentiful, but enterprise adoption remains low. We look at some reasons why, plus ways companies can improve their uptake.
  • Previous
    2 - Underestimating the Difficulty of Change Management Required to Gain Adoption
    Next

    Underestimating the Difficulty of Change Management Required to Gain Adoption

    Companies often deploy collaboration technologies without providing their employees with guidance on which tools they should use and why, sometimes giving employees multiple, overlapping solutions. Without understanding how to use these tools, the right content and information is not being generated, and companies are unable to drive usage. Employees become frustrated, disengaged and will ultimately abandon the solution.
  • Previous
    3 - Forgetting to Tie Collaboration to Specific Business Objectives and Initiatives
    Next

    Forgetting to Tie Collaboration to Specific Business Objectives and Initiatives

    Most companies' objectives typically aren't centered on whether people are merely collaborating better or have generally increased productivity. Companies typically are focused on key performance indicators, such as increased revenue, reduction in operating costs, better customer service, reduction in turnover and faster time to market. When disconnected from goals or objectives, the collaboration initiative will not be considered relevant or critical to the organization. In turn, this will lead to a lack of executive sponsorship and mindshare.
  • Previous
    4 - Attempting to Connect All People Instead of the Right People
    Next

    Attempting to Connect All People Instead of the Right People

    It's not enough to just set up a collaboration system to connect employees together—enterprise-grade collaboration tools are not the same as going on Facebook or Instagram. Employees need to understand with whom they are connecting, how they can find the right experts and get recommendations of people relevant to getting their work done. Furthermore, it's important not to have any artificial barriers to collaboration; employees need to have the ability to connect with partners, suppliers and customers when and how they need, in a manner that is secure and traceable.
  • Previous
    5 - Leaving Processes and Business Information Disconnected From Enterprise Collaboration
    Next

    Leaving Processes and Business Information Disconnected From Enterprise Collaboration

    When enterprise collaboration supports employees in their daily tasks, they will be adopted and highly used. That means employees will need to easily be able to access content and data from other business process systems to have full context of what problems need to be solved or what decisions need to be made. There should be no silos of collaboration or roadblocks to bringing in process data.
  • Previous
    6 - Not Establishing Clear and Easy-to-Follow Governance to Keep Content Relevant
    Next

    Not Establishing Clear and Easy-to-Follow Governance to Keep Content Relevant

    People will only continue to use a system if content is relevant and easy to access. Content governance policies must be established, but they also must be flexible enough to allow employees to connect, collaborate and get work done without interference. Too much governance will cause problems in keeping content current, and too little will mean an overwhelming amount of outdated and inaccurate information.
  • Previous
    7 - Focusing Too Much on Tech Solutions Before Understanding Business Drivers
    Next

    Focusing Too Much on Tech Solutions Before Understanding Business Drivers

    Not all collaboration tools are equal, though many boast the same basic functionality. The challenge in selecting a solution without knowing what business problems need to be solved is that companies may end up focusing on specific features. Before starting an evaluation of vendors, the best approach is to first think about what business challenges the company is trying to solve.
 

Every company in the world needs its employees to communicate with one another—there isn't a single business that can operate without employees being connected to each other. But enterprise collaboration often has a bad reputation, usually due to a failed attempt at gaining internal adoption around a specific solution. Indeed, enterprise collaboration projects often fail. Why is this? Enterprise collaboration tools can be successful if the company can derive real business value and benefits that address its objectives. The tools also need to be woven into the current processes and systems so they're a natural part of how people get their work done. Based on an interview with Daisy Hernandez, global vice president of product management for SAP Jam Collaboration, this eWEEK slide show illustrates the common pitfalls to avoid when implementing collaboration technology across the enterprise to achieve maximum value from a social collaboration initiative. (SAP's Jam is an enterprise social collaboration software platform that can be worth millions in ROI, according to Forrester.)

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...
 
Manage your Newsletters: Login   Register My Newsletters























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rocket Fuel