How Microsoft Edge Will Bring IE Users Into Modern Browser Era

 
 
By Don Reisinger  |  Posted 2015-05-05
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    How Microsoft Edge Will Bring IE Users Into Modern Browser Era
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    How Microsoft Edge Will Bring IE Users Into Modern Browser Era

    By Don Reisinger
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    Following Trends, Edge Has a Stripped-Down Design
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    Following Trends, Edge Has a Stripped-Down Design

    A core element of modern browser designs is their stripped-down look and feel. Edge conforms to that trend by streamlining the browsing experience so users can find information and Websites as quickly as possible. Microsoft says that this sparse design will persuade users to switch from using the familiar Internet Explorer.
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    Edge Has a  Single Address Bar for All Browsing Chores
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    Edge Has a Single Address Bar for All Browsing Chores

    Like Google's Chrome, Edge has a single address bar that handles both URL inputs and searching. So, users can type a search query into the address bar and automatically search Bing. The app also includes search suggestions in the address bar and will provide some URL guesses based on what the user is typing in.
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    The Hub Is Browser Central for Microsoft Edge
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    The Hub Is Browser Central for Microsoft Edge

    Microsoft Edge comes with a Hub, which will be the single repository for everything a user really cares about when in a browser. The Hub includes a listing of favorites, history and downloads, and will also provide a reading list. When the Hub is opened, it pops up as a right sidebar.
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    It's a Doodle-Friendly Browser
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    It's a Doodle-Friendly Browser

    Microsoft says that Edge will be a completely doodle-friendly browser. What that means is when users access Edge from a tablet, they can use their fingers to circle items, highlight content and more. The feature also works in the desktop version of Edge with a tool called "Web Note."
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    Maintain Edge Reading Lists for Any Device
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    Maintain Edge Reading Lists for Any Device

    Like other browsers, Microsoft Edge will come with a reading list, allowing users to create a list of articles they'd like to read at another time. When users access the Hub, they can instantly add an article to the reading list. It'll be saved there until it's needed again. The reading list is a separate pane from favorites and history.
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    Cortana Travels to Edge
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    Cortana Travels to Edge

    Cortana, Microsoft's virtual personal assistant that has made a mark on Windows Phone and will be included in Windows 10, will also run in Edge. Cortana will make it easier for Edge users to search for content, Microsoft says. In addition, Cortana has built-in features that will allow it to make reservations or share directions to a location. Cortana is getting smarter each year, and it appears it will play a major role in Edge.
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    Edge Reading View Provides Distraction-Free Browsing
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    Edge Reading View Provides Distraction-Free Browsing

    Microsoft Edge includes a reading view, allowing users to isolate a Web page to read an article without distraction. While the feature isn't new—other companies offer a similar option—it comes with several customizations. Those customizations include how the reading style should look and font size.
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    Expect Edge to Work the Same Across Most Device Types
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    Expect Edge to Work the Same Across Most Device Types

    One of the core features built into Edge is that the browser comes with support across multiple devices. So, users will find Edge on PCs and mobile devices. Microsoft hasn't said that the Edge browsing experience will be different depending on what type of device it's running on. So users should expect about the same experience whether they're working on a laptop, desktop or tablet.
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    Microsoft Is Promising Faster Download Speeds
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    Microsoft Is Promising Faster Download Speeds

    At its recent Build conference, Microsoft discussed Edge's core features, emphasizing that its stripped-down design will enable download speeds that are faster than on Internet Explorer. Microsoft says that it has also updated the browser's code to capitalize on the latest Web standards, making it even faster.
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    It Feels Similar to Competing Browsers
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    It Feels Similar to Competing Browsers

    Microsoft Edge appears to be much of what folks would expect from a new-age browser. Edge's stripped-down design and other features appear in Chrome and Firefox. Edge is not entirely a catch-up product, but it is following a similar path toward a more barebones design previously traveled by its competitors.
 

Microsoft has a new Web browser it's now calling Edge. It's the product of the Project Spartan development effort that we heard about earlier this year. The introduction of a redesigned browser 19 years and 11 editions after Microsoft first introduced Internet Explorer in 1995 is a major change for the company. It's indicative of the company's efforts to modernize its software product lines in response to the changing needs of customers around the globe. Microsoft has already done the same thing with Office and Azure, and now it's doing it with its Internet Explorer's replacement, Edge. But with Edge, Microsoft faces the task of explaining to longtime Windows and Internet Explorer users what they can expect in a brand-new browser. It's a risky move by Microsoft because for the first time in nearly 20 years it has to convince Web users why they should keep using a Microsoft browser.  From a streamlined design to promote faster browsing to support across multiple devices, this slide show will cover how Edge is trying to fix the shortcomings of Internet Explorer while preserving the virtues that made it a top browsing tool for some many years.

 
 
 
 
 
Don Reisinger is a freelance technology columnist. He started writing about technology for Ziff-Davis' Gearlog.com. Since then, he has written extremely popular columns for CNET.com, Computerworld, InformationWeek, and others. He has appeared numerous times on national television to share his expertise with viewers. You can follow his every move at http://twitter.com/donreisinger.
 
 
 
 
 
 

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