PTC Demonstrates Augmented Reality for the Enterprise

 
 
By Jeffrey Burt  |  Posted 2016-02-01
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • Previous
    PTC Demonstrates Augmented Reality for the Enterprise
    Next

    PTC Demonstrates Augmented Reality for the Enterprise

    PTC sees augmented reality making a huge impact in the enterprise. Here's a look at the strides PTC has made in AR that it showed off at a recent event.
  • Previous
    Leading the Charge
    Next

    Leading the Charge

    PTC CEO Jim Heppelmann said the real future for augmented reality (AR) is in business. "These consumer applications just scratch the surface of the potential of AR," he said. "Now is the time for enterprise AR. Where AR already impacts how we play, it's about to disrupt how we work."
  • Previous
    The Technology That Makes It Happen
    Next

    The Technology That Makes It Happen

    PTC in October 2015 spent $65 million to buy Vuforia and its AR platform, which is being used by more than 200,000 developers who have built more than 20,000 apps for smartphones, tablets and digital eyewear. "Today, we have a huge enterprise opportunity in front of us," said Jay Wright, general manager for Vuforia at PTC.
  • Previous
    Partnering on the IoT
    Next

    Partnering on the IoT

    Heppelmann said the Internet of things (IoT) is rapidly expanding the opportunity for AR in the enterprise. PTC and ServiceMax in January unveiled a partnership that uses PTC's ThingWorx IoT platform. ServiceMax CEO David Yarnold, right, said the jointly developed Connected Field Services offering will help transform the services industry, and AR will be part of that effort. "We are now just beginning to see the possible opportunities for AR to impact services," Yarnold said.
  • Previous
    Showing AR at Work
    Next

    Showing AR at Work

    After Heppelmann and others made their presentation, attendees were invited to a demonstration area, where they were shown how AR can be used to help businesses.
  • Previous
    AR and the KLM Motorcycle
    Next

    AR and the KLM Motorcycle

    KLM officials brought one of the company's performance motorcycles to the event to show attendees how PTC's AR software can help reduce service times and costs.
  • Previous
    Making the VuMark
    Next

    Making the VuMark

    The VuMark is a technology that PTC introduced at the show that essentially works as a barcode for the AR world. The VuMark—which contains encoded data about the product—is placed on the product and can be detected by PTC's AR software on a tablet or other device. The application reads the VuMark and extracts the data—such as a URL or product serial number—and displays it on the screen. Each of the systems in the multiple demonstrations had a VuMark.
  • Previous
    Service With the Help of AR
    Next

    Service With the Help of AR

    The PTC software can help service technicians by displaying product information on the screen, diagnosing the problem, offering step-by-step instructions for fixing the problem and even showing—as in the photo—how each step is done.
  • Previous
    AR Through the Smart Glass
    Next

    AR Through the Smart Glass

    ODG, which makes smart glasses that can run PTC's AR software, also was at the event. PTC's Wright said that while most AR now is done on tablets, the real promise is in devices like smart glasses and goggles. "While the future of AR is on our head, it's actually starting in our hands," he said.
  • Previous
    Samsung and VR
    Next

    Samsung and VR

    Samsung also was at the event with smart goggles that can hold a Galaxy smartphone that runs PTC's software. A representative demonstrated how the goggles combined with VR technology could help service technicians diagnose and fix problems with a motorcycle.
 

PTC has its roots in the product lifecycle management (PLM) and application lifecycle management (ALM) fields. However, under CEO Jim Heppelmann, the 30-year-old software maker over the past couple of years has spent hundreds of millions of dollars buying companies—such as ThingWorx, ColdLight and, most recently, Vuforia—to build out its capabilities in the Internet of things (IoT), augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR). AR—which brings together the physical and virtual worlds by superimposing computer-generated elements to augment what a person sees—has gotten play in the consumer world in such areas as video games and marketing. However, it will have a huge impact in the enterprise, and PTC will be a leader in making that happen, Heppelmann said at a recent event in Boston that was broadcast to more than 14,000 people worldwide. Heppelmann, other PTC executives, partners and customers—including motorcycle maker KTM; Schneider Electric, which makes data center power management equipment; and Sysmex, which makes clinical testing systems for health care facilities—showed off the strides the company has made in AR, offering demonstrations of new technologies the company is rolling out. This eWEEK slide show takes a look at some of the highlights of the event.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...
 
Manage your Newsletters: Login   Register My Newsletters























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rocket Fuel