This eWeek

OK, so Dice-D didn't quite repeat his stellar opening day pitching performance when he had his first home game in a Red Sox uniform at Boston's Fenway Park last week.

OK, so Dice-D didnt quite repeat his stellar opening day pitching performance when he had his first home game in a Red Sox uniform at Bostons Fenway Park last week. Maybe the chilly Boston weather shut down his shuuto fastball or maybe he was holding that mysterious gyroball for another game when it felt more like springtime than the dead of winter.

In any case, you can bet that the Japanese pitching phenoms throws will be analyzed, scrutinized, categorized and digitally shuttled around the league in a way that those cigar-chomping, stubby-pencil-using opposing team scouts never contemplated in years past.

In this weeks cover story, "Keeping an eye on the game," Senior Writer Chris Preimesberger provides readers with an insiders view on how digital archiving, storage and BI (that would be baseball intelligence, as opposed to business intelligence) have come to be major-league players behind the baseball scene.

It only makes sense that with baseball contracts routinely topping the $100 million mark, you want to make sure you provide your players with as much information about the opposition as they can handle. While Chris article, which starts on Page 27, focuses on the San Francisco Giants (at least it wasnt the Yankees!), his insight into the technology behind baseball should be required reading for anyone thinking that tech is not a major player on the baseball diamonds this year.

And anyone who thinks Linux is not a major player in the operating system market should read Advanced Technologies Analyst Jason Brooks review of the most recent release of Red Hats Enterprise Linux. Out in the blogosphere, there is an ongoing debate on whether server and client operating systems (and, in particular, Microsofts offerings) really matter in an era of hosted and Web-based applications.

Speaking for the business-to-business world, I can tell you it does matter a whole lot to companies what engine is running their applications. Beyond the technical specs, customers want to know what the license requirements are, how the OS plays in a virtualized environment and what the upgrade path is. Jason touches on all these topics in his review, starting on Page 35. OK, so Dice-D didnt quite repeat his stellar opening day pitching performance when he had his first home game in a Red Sox uniform at Bostons Fenway Park last week. Maybe the chilly Boston weather shut down his shuuto fastball or maybe he was holding that mysterious gyroball for another game when it felt more like springtime than the dead of winter. In any case, you can bet that the Japanese pitching phenoms throws will be analyzed, scrutinized, categorized and digitally shuttled around the league in a way that those cigar-chomping, stubby-pencil-using opposing team scouts never contemplated in years past. In this weeks cover story, "Keeping an eye on the game," Senior Writer Chris Preimesberger provides readers with an insiders view on how digital archiving, storage and BI (that would be baseball intelligence, as opposed to business intelligence) have come to be major-league players behind the baseball scene. It only makes sense that with baseball contracts routinely topping the $100 million mark, you want to make sure you provide your players with as much information about the opposition as they can handle. While Chris article, which starts on Page 27, focuses on the San Francisco Giants (at least it wasnt the Yankees!), his insight into the technology behind baseball should be required reading for anyone thinking that tech is not a major player on the baseball diamonds this year. And anyone who thinks Linux is not a major player in the operating system market should read Advanced Technologies Analyst Jason Brooks review of the most recent release of Red Hats Enterprise Linux. Out in the blogosphere, there is an ongoing debate on whether server and client operating systems (and, in particular, Microsofts offerings) really matter in an era of hosted and Web-based applications. Speaking for the business-to-business world, I can tell you it does matter a whole lot to companies what engine is running their applications. Beyond the technical specs, customers want to know what the license requirements are, how the OS plays in a virtualized environment and what the upgrade path is. Jason touches on all these topics in his review, starting on Page 35. OK, so Dice-D didnt quite repeat his stellar opening day pitching performance when he had his first home game in a Red Sox uniform at Bostons Fenway Park last week. Maybe the chilly Boston weather shut down his shuuto fastball or maybe he was holding that mysterious gyroball for another game when it felt more like springtime than the dead of winter. In any case, you can bet that the Japanese pitching phenoms throws will be analyzed, scrutinized, categorized and digitally shuttled around the league in a way that those cigar-chomping, stubby-pencil-using opposing team scouts never contemplated in years past. In this weeks cover story, "Keeping an eye on the game," Senior Writer Chris Preimesberger provides readers with an insiders view on how digital archiving, storage and BI (that would be baseball intelligence, as opposed to business intelligence) have come to be major-league players behind the baseball scene. It only makes sense that with baseball contracts routinely topping the $100 million mark, you want to make sure you provide your players with as much information about the opposition as they can handle. While Chris article, which starts on Page 27, focuses on the San Francisco Giants (at least it wasnt the Yankees!), his insight into the technology behind baseball should be required reading for anyone thinking that tech is not a major player on the baseball diamonds this year. And anyone who thinks Linux is not a major player in the operating system market should read Advanced Technologies Analyst Jason Brooks review of the most recent release of Red Hats Enterprise Linux. Out in the blogosphere, there is an ongoing debate on whether server and client operating systems (and, in particular, Microsofts offerings) really matter in an era of hosted and Web-based applications. Speaking for the business-to-business world, I can tell you it does matter a whole lot to companies what engine is running their applications. Beyond the technical specs, customers want to know what the license requirements are, how the OS plays in a virtualized environment and what the upgrade path is. Jason touches on all these topics in his review, starting on Page 35.

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