25 Things You Might Not Know About Apple

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25 Things You Might Not Know About Apple

by Nicholas Kolakowski

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Steve Jobs attributed a childhood fascination with "Heathkits," hobbyist kits that let you assemble electronic equipment by hand, as first giving him "self-confidence" in building products.

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Back in 1977, a high-end Apple II system with 48 kilobytes of RAM, a 6-kilobyte BASIC interpreter, and a case and keyboard cost $2,778. Moores Law at work.

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Contrast the Apple IIs cost and specs with a high-end Apple PC today: A 27-inch iMac with a 2.8GHz Quad-Core Intel Core i7 processor, 16GB RAM and a 2TB Serial ATA hard drive costs $3,937 via the Apple Store.

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"The Macintosh will die in another few years and its really sad," Jobs told an interviewer in 1995, during his exile at NeXT. "The problem is this: No one at Apple has a clue as to how to create the next Macintosh."

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Apples retail stores number some 284 worldwide.

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Apples original logo featured more than just fruit: There was also Isaac Newton, reading under a tree.

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"Rock and Roll will never die. It is, however, being reborn." That 2003 slogan helped Apple sell the concept of iTunes, with its 99-cent songs and $9.99 albums.

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The New York Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) has a Power Mac G4 Cube as part of its collection.

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Before the name "iPad" was announced for Apples tablet PC, rumors circulated that it could be named "iSlate" or "iTablet."

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In 2006, Pixar was sold to Disney for $7.4 billion. Jobs had originally purchased the animation studio from George Lucas for $5 million, plus invested another $5 million in the company.

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Before the iPad or the iPod Touch, there was the Apple Newton, a PDA that died messily in 1998 after nine years of development.

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Microsoft made a $150 million investment in a struggling Apple in 1997. "We have to let go of the notion that for Apple to win, Microsoft has to lose," Steve Jobs told the audience during the announcement.

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Apple reached its 1 billionth application downloaded from the App Store on April 23, 2009.

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Some of the most-downloaded free applications from the App Store have included Facebook for iPhone and Google Earth. Bestselling paid apps have included Koi Pond and Crash Bandicoot Nitro Kart 3D.

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"Remembering Ill be dead soon is the most important tool Ive ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life," Jobs told a graduating class at Stanford in 2005.

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Apple dropped "Apple Computer" from its name to become just "Apple Inc." in 2007, signaling the companys shift into mobile and other non-PC areas.

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Apples initial expectations for the iPhone was that it would take a 1 percent global market share by the end of 2008. According to Gartner, iPhone global market share in Q4 2008 was 10.7 percent.

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In a bid to be environmentally friendly, Macs include PVC-free power cords and mercury-free LED-backlit displays. The iPhone "ships free of BFRs, PVC, arsenic and mercury," according to the company.

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Apples board of directors reportedly hated the now-iconic "1984" ad for the Macintosh that aired—just once—during the 1984 Super Bowl.

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Research firm IDC has predicted that the App Store will contain some 300,000 apps by the end of 2010.

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Apple entered the Fortune 500 at 411 in 1983.

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Officially, the Apple Lisa (which debuted in 1983) stood for Local Integrated Software Architecture ("Lisa"). One common assumption, or even misconception, was that the computer was named after Jobs first daughter.

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Apple designed a custom processor for the iPad, the 1GHz Apple A4.

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Apple designer Jonathan Ive and his team once visited a candy factory to figure out how to mass-produce consistent colors for the iMac.

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