Liftoff

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Liftoff

Here's a look at the nighttime liftoff of the Falcon 9 rocket, carrying the Dragon spacecraft, from Launch Complex 40 in Cape Canaveral, Fla., on Oct. 7.

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Observing

Fans of the mission take photos of the CRS-1 Dragon launch to the ISS from Cape Canaveral, which lifted off at 8:35 p.m. ET.

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SpaceX HQ

SpaceX employees watch the Falcon 9 and Dragon launch at the company's headquarters in Hawthorne, Calif.

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Vertical

The Falcon 9 and Dragon go vertical on the launch pad ahead of the takeoff. The mission will carry supplies to the ISS and return to Earth two weeks later.

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Mating Season

The Dragon spacecraft awaits mating operations to the Falcon 9 rocket before SpaceX's first launch to the ISS earlier this week.

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Paired

Engineers mate the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft to the Falcon 9 rocket on Sept. 30, ahead of the launch to the ISS.

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Merlin

The Falcon 9 rocket, complete with nine Merlin engines, awaits launch. The Falcon 9 is a two-stage launch vehicle that is powered by liquid oxygen and rocket-grade kerosene (RP-1).

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Static Fire

On Sept. 29, SpaceX conducted a static fire test of the Falcon 9 rocket's nine engines, where engineers ran through all countdown processes, ending with all nine engines firing at full power for two seconds while Falcon 9 was held down to the pad.

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The Next Step

SpaceX CRS-1 is an important step toward making America's microgravity research program self-sufficient by providing a way to deliver and return significant amounts of cargo.

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Attachment

A grainy screenshot taken from NASA's live television feed from the ISS shows the Dragon spacecraft successfully captured by one of the station's robotic arms.

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