Glassdoor Study Finds Wide Worker Support for Closing Gender Pay Gap

 
 
By Don Reisinger  |  Posted 2016-02-18
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    Glassdoor Study Finds Wide Worker Support for Closing Gender Pay Gap
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    Glassdoor Study Finds Wide Worker Support for Closing Gender Pay Gap

    Glassdoor polled men and women about their views on the gender pay gap. The findings offer insight for companies hoping to recruit the best talent for a job.
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    Nearly Everyone Wants Equal Pay
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    Nearly Everyone Wants Equal Pay

    The Glassdoor study shows clearly that nearly everyone wants equal pay. In fact, 93 percent of U.S. adults say that women should make as much as men for similar work and experience. Surprisingly, 5 percent of women in the United States and Canada say that women should not be compensated equally for the same work and experience.
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    Employees Don't Seem to Find Fault With Their Employers
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    Employees Don't Seem to Find Fault With Their Employers

    While most people agree that there is a gender pay gap, they think the issue exists outside their companies. Glassdoor found that 74 percent of respondents worldwide believe their employers offer equal pay. It's worth noting, however, that women are far less likely than men to believe their employers offer equal pay for equal work.
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    A Look at How U.S. Employees View Their Employers
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    A Look at How U.S. Employees View Their Employers

    When American men and women were asked if their employer offers equal pay for equal work, they were less likely than many of their counterparts in other countries to agree. In fact, 70 percent of Americans think that their employers are paying women fairly. That was notably lower than the Netherlands, where 83 percent of people believe their companies are fairly paying women for equal work.
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    Men and Women Don't Agree on Equal Pay
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    Men and Women Don't Agree on Equal Pay

    In the United States, men and women just can't agree on equal pay. Glassdoor found that 78 percent of men believe their employers pay men and women equally, compared to just 60 percent of women. About a third of women say their employers are part of the wage gap issue, nearly doubling the number of men who said the same.
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    Women Are More Concerned About Fair Pay
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    Women Are More Concerned About Fair Pay

    Women around the world are especially concerned with whether they receive fair compensation. About two-thirds of women in the United States say that they feel they're fairly compensated for their jobs. One-third of female respondents say they should earn more. Men are more likely to believe they're fairly compensated, with 73 percent saying they're pleased with their compensation.
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    Views on Pay Equality Don't Vary According to Location
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    Views on Pay Equality Don't Vary According to Location

    In every question Glassdoor asked, there's a consistent tone—from the United States to Switzerland—among men and women. In general, men are less likely to see a gender pay gap issue at their employers and believe they're fairly compensated. The percentage of women who see their compensation as unfair and believe a pay gap issue exists is strikingly consistent across the seven countries included in the study.
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    Companies Can Learn a Thing or Two
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    Companies Can Learn a Thing or Two

    The Glassdoor data includes some important factors companies could consider. In addition to offering equal pay, Glassdoor says companies should promote their fair-pay regulations. The study shows that 67 percent of U.S. employees will not apply for a job where they believe a pay gap exists between men and women. What's more, 81 percent of women say they would definitely not apply for a job at an unfair workplace. That leaves a very small pool of qualified employees, if a company is believed not to offer fair pay to women.
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    There's an Age Component Here
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    There's an Age Component Here

    Age is also a factor in whether a person will apply for a job when he or she knows a wage gap exists. In general, older people are more willing to apply for a job than younger people. In the United States, for instance, 81 percent of people between the ages of 18 and 24 wouldn't want to work for an unfair employer, compared to 63 percent of those over the age of 55 who said the same thing.
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    Here's How Companies Can Address the Issue
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    Here's How Companies Can Address the Issue

    Solving the pay gap may not be easy, but employees believe companies must do their part. In the United States, 45 percent of employees want to see new company policies to ensure wage equality. One-third of Americans want greater clarity into how pay raises and bonuses are calculated, and another third say pay transparency for all positions is critical. One in five American women say that females should "demand pay raises more frequently" to improve the pay gap.
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    Workers Support Government Action
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    Workers Support Government Action

    Employees agree that the government may also play a role in addressing the issue of wage gaps. Glassdoor says that 39 percent of U.S. employees believe government legislation forcing companies to pay equally, regardless of gender, is critical to ultimately closing the wage gap. Just 11 percent of Americans believe protests would address the issue.
 

The gender wage gap refers to the difference in what men and women will make when performing the same job. In recent years, this metric has garnered more attention across all industries, including technology. In a recent study, Glassdoor, a company that provides a forum for employees to review their workplaces, discovered that the vast majority of people do not believe the gender wage gap is an issue where they work. In fact, the study, which includes responses from more than 8,000 adults across seven countries, finds that people generally believe that their employers aren't part of the gender pay gap issue. They nearly all agree, however, that a pay gap exists. But that's just the tip of the iceberg. Glassdoor's findings reveal that the views of men and women sharply diverge on this issue. The findings also offer valuable insight for companies hoping to recruit the best talent for a job. This slide show highlights some of the study's salient points and get to the crux of how the gender pay gap is affecting companies around the world.

 
 
 
 
 
Don Reisinger is a freelance technology columnist. He started writing about technology for Ziff-Davis' Gearlog.com. Since then, he has written extremely popular columns for CNET.com, Computerworld, InformationWeek, and others. He has appeared numerous times on national television to share his expertise with viewers. You can follow his every move at http://twitter.com/donreisinger.
 
 
 
 
 
 

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