IT Jobs Outlook Healthy Despite Some Pain Points in Q1

 
 
By Nathan Eddy  |  Posted 2014-04-14
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    IT Jobs Outlook Healthy Despite Some Pain Points in Q1
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    IT Jobs Outlook Healthy Despite Some Pain Points in Q1

    By Nathan Eddy
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    Full-Time and Contingent Worker Hiring Below Expectations
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    Full-Time and Contingent Worker Hiring Below Expectations

    About 35 percent of IT leaders surveyed said hiring rose in the first quarter for full-time and contingent employees, TekSystems reported. In a November poll, 47 percent forecast first-quarter increases for full-time staff and 46% predicted gains in hiring for contingent workers.
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    Fewer IT Leaders Received Budget Increases
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    Fewer IT Leaders Received Budget Increases

    Heading into 2014, 62 percent of those polled said they expected their IT budgets to increase, yet just 47 percent now see this to be the case, TekSystems reported.
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    Business Intelligence, Security Workers in Demand
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    Business Intelligence, Security Workers in Demand

    Tech skills in fast-growing markets is much sought after. IT leaders now rank security, business intelligence and big data experts among the top-three most difficult positions to fill. Business analyst remains the fourth most difficult role to fill, the TekSystems survey revealed.
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    Confidence in Ability to Satisfy Business Needs Endures
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    Confidence in Ability to Satisfy Business Needs Endures

    Although IT budgets are tight, the percentage of respondents who are confident in their IT department’s ability to satisfy business demands has increased from 66 percent at the end of 2013 to 72 percent at the end of the first quarter, TekSystems reported.
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    Tighter Budgets Affected Hiring
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    Tighter Budgets Affected Hiring

    So far this year, IT leaders' over-optimism regarding budgets appears to have affected hiring, said TekSystems' Research Manager Jason Hayman. It will be interesting to see how conditions develop—either falling in line with or skewing further away from expectations—and how organizations will adapt, he said.
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    Tech Unemployment at Post-Recession Low
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    Tech Unemployment at Post-Recession Low

    Dice's tally of Labor Department data shows the tech unemployment rate fell during the first quarter to 2.7 percent, from 3.5 percent in last year’s first quarter but is still above the record low of 1.8 percent in the second quarter of 2007. (December 2007 was the first month of the last recession.)
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    Confidence Still Lags in IT Industry
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    Confidence Still Lags in IT Industry

    "Consistent confidence has been hard to come by in this recovery," the Dice report said. That affects the rate at which people leave jobs. The number of IT pros quitting their jobs in the first quarter rose from low levels.
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    More Companies Turning to Consultants
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    More Companies Turning to Consultants

    Tech consulting added 17,200 new positions in the first quarter, Dice reported. On average, consultants earned $42.17 per hour and worked 38.8 hours per week in February—both records
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    What's Driving Need for Consultants?
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    What's Driving Need for Consultants?

    More companies are turning to consultants "to help them harness the new tech age: analytics and data, infrastructure flexibility, and making internal and external applications easy to use," Shravan Goli, Dice president, said in the report.
 

The employment outlook for IT professionals remains robust, yet companies are cautious about adding tech workers. Fewer gains in IT hiring occurred than expected in the first quarter, with a little more than a third of IT leaders indicating that hiring full-time and contingent IT workers increased, a study from TEKsystems finds. Yet the IT staffing and service firm reported that the majority of those surveyed think demand for IT pros will always outpace supply. Additionally, a new report from IT jobs and career site Dice found more employers are willing to step up to retain technology talent, staving off resignations. Dice's data suggests employers are working harder to keep existing tech employees and to attract new ones. Dice found 41 percent of hiring managers and recruiters surveyed reported an increase in counter-offers from existing employers, and 34 percent of respondents are seeing candidates turn down job offers. In this slide show, eWEEK takes a look at key data points from Dice and TEKsystems.

 
 
 
 
 
Nathan Eddy is Associate Editor, Midmarket, at eWEEK.com. Before joining eWEEK.com, Nate was a writer with ChannelWeb and he served as an editor at FierceMarkets. He is a graduate of the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University.
 
 
 
 
 
 

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