From Bracelets to Smartwatches, Wearable Devices Make Splash at IDF

From Bracelets to Smartwatches, Wearable Devices Make Splash at IDF
Wearable Tech From Above
MICA With Mica
It's Jewelry First, Then Technology
But the Technology Is Important
Keeping an Ear to Wearables
Working on Fitness-Focused Ear Buds
The Basis of Smartwatches
And One Bowl to Charge Them All
1 of 9

From Bracelets to Smartwatches, Wearable Devices Make Splash at IDF

By Jeffrey Burt

2 of 9

Wearable Tech From Above

Intel took a decidedly modernistic approach to the section of the Moscone Center set aside for the wearable devices.

3 of 9

MICA With Mica

The MICA bracelets were put on display beside some mica crystals.

4 of 9

It's Jewelry First, Then Technology

The MICA bracelets, which feature embedded pearls, lapis stones, Russian obsidian and Tiger's Eye, are made to look beautiful on a woman's wrist. "People have enough gadgets, and for wearables to succeed, they have to be something other than just gadgets," says Greg McKelvey, executive vice president and chief strategy and marketing officer at Fossil Group.

5 of 9

But the Technology Is Important

On the side on the inside of the wrist, the MICA bracelet features a curved sapphire touch-screen display that will receive SMS messages, calendar reminders and general alerts. It will sell for less than $1,000.

6 of 9

Keeping an Ear to Wearables

Intel is teaming up with SMS Audio, which makes these SYNC by 50 On-Ear wireless sport earphones, on various projects.

7 of 9

Working on Fitness-Focused Ear Buds

Intel and SMS in August unveiled the BioSport In-Ear headphones, which can track a runner's heart rate and is battery-free, with the device being powered via a smartphone's audio jack.

8 of 9

The Basis of Smartwatches

Intel had Basis' smart fitness trackers on display at IDF. During the show, Mike Bell, vice president and general manager of Intel's New Devices Group, said the next iteration will be called Basis Peak and will hit the market before the end of the year.

9 of 9

And One Bowl to Charge Them All

Wireless charging of electronic devices is a key focus for Intel, which is part of the Alliance for Wireless Power industry consortium. The chip maker showed off a bowl in which users can place their devices to charge them.

Top White Papers and Webcasts