How Samsung Plans to Move Beyond Galaxy Note 7 Fire Debacle

1 - How Samsung Plans to Move Beyond Galaxy Note 7 Fire Debacle
2 - Samsung Pinpoints Battery Defect Causes
3 - Samsung Promises Improved Manufacturing Processes
4 - Better Hardware Designs Are in the Works
5 - Improved Software Functions
6 - A Focus on Batteries
7 - Reliance on Outside Help
8 - The Galaxy Note 7 Could Live On
9 - Samsung Isn’t Turning Its Back on Galaxy Note
10 - Next Up: The Samsung Galaxy S8
11 - More Value for the Price
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How Samsung Plans to Move Beyond Galaxy Note 7 Fire Debacle

Samsung disclosed the details about what caused battery defects that caused fires and explosions in Galaxy Note7 Smartphones and discussed product plans for 2017.

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Samsung Pinpoints Battery Defect Causes

According to Samsung, its first-run and second-run Galaxy Note 7 units suffered from separate battery flaws. The first recall was due in part to an abnormal electrode within the battery that caused short circuits and overheating. In the second recall, Samsung found some batteries had manufacturing defects that caused direct contact between positive and negative electrodes, which also caused short circuits and rapid overheating. In other cases, the batteries failed because insulating tape was too thin or missing from the electrodes.

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Samsung Promises Improved Manufacturing Processes

Samsung has promised better quality control of manufacturing processes. For batteries, Samsung said it will use an “eight-point safety check test” that will include an analysis of a smartphone battery’s durability. Testers also will inspect the battery with the human eye and via x-ray to see how it operates while it charges. They even will disassemble the battery to ensure it’s safe.

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Better Hardware Designs Are in the Works

While Samsung said hardware wasn’t a problem in the Galaxy Note 7 fiasco, the company still will make some tweaks to how its products are made. Specifically, Samsung will add brackets to areas around the battery to protect it and reduce chances of damage causing malfunctions.

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Improved Software Functions

Samsung similarly said software wasn’t to blame in the Galaxy Note 7. However, the company said that it will deliver better algorithms in the handset that manage “battery charging temperature, charging current and charging duration.” Those moves will “put safety first,” Samsung said.

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A Focus on Batteries

In addition to creating new battery checks, Samsung said it plans to create a Battery Safety Design Standard. The idea is to improve its safety standards for materials that ultimately make up a smartphone’s battery. The better the standards, Samsung argued, the safer its handsets will be.

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Reliance on Outside Help

Samsung isn’t just relying on its own people to safeguard future batteries. The company has created a Battery Advisory Group made up entirely of advisers, academics and researchers who will have “a clear and objective perspective on battery safety and innovation.” The group has four members.

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The Galaxy Note 7 Could Live On

Samsung hasn’t ruled out the possibility of bringing back the Galaxy Note 7. In fact, the company is reportedly working on refurbishing the Galaxy Note 7 with batteries that aren’t subject to the aforementioned flaws. It’s possible, though not confirmed, that Samsung sells refurbished Galaxy Note 7 units this year.

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Samsung Isn’t Turning Its Back on Galaxy Note

In an interview with CNET, Samsung confirmed that it will maintain the Galaxy Note branding. The company said that it’s working on a Galaxy Note 8 that could find its way to store shelves later this year. Samsung didn’t share many details on its plans, but said that the handset will be designed to improve its relationship with customers and still deliver innovative features.

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Next Up: The Samsung Galaxy S8

Samsung confirmed it’s working on a new high-end handset called the Galaxy S8. Over the last several months, rumors have been swirling over what the company has planned for the device. Samsung didn’t announce its plans, but tossed water on reports the smartphone would be unveiled at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona in February. It appears now that Samsung could be planning to showcase the new device in April.

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More Value for the Price

Samsung has a lot of fixing to do in its relationship with customers. So, the company is trying to bundle major innovations and new features into its upcoming high-end devices. But Samsung is also cognizant of its need to rebuild relationships. Look for Samsung to offer some of its most compelling devices in recent memory while also keeping prices in check. Samsung’s handsets this year might prove more appealing than ever.

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