INSIDE MOBILE: Microsoft Windows Phone 7: If At First You Don't Succeed

Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer introduced Windows Phone 7 on Monday, October 11, 2010. Here, Knowledge Center mobile and wireless analyst J. Gerry Purdy explores the new technical innovations of Windows Phone 7 and explains why he thinks Windows Phone 7 will be received well by both consumers and enterprise users.

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You have to hand it to Microsoft. They have certainly fulfilled the old saying, "If at first you don't succeed, try, try again." Microsoft has had a number of previous attempts to build a successful operating system for the mobile market with WinPad, Windows Mobile and Win CE. These efforts-simply because they were from Microsoft-generated some market presence, but nowhere near the market share achieved by major players such as RIM (BlackBerry), Apple (iPhone) and Google (Android).

I thought it was poignant when Rob Tiffany, Mobility Architect for Windows Phone 7 (WP7), told me at CTIA that Microsoft went back to the drawing board to develop a new mobile operating system from the ground up. Steve Ballmer, Microsoft CEO, introduced WP7 on Monday, October 11, 2010 at a press conference in New York.

The reviews on WP7 have generally been positive. I appeared on Brian Sullivan's show on Fox Business to explain why I thought Microsoft would succeed with WP7, especially in the enterprise space.

One of the most important changes that WP7 provides over past Windows Mobile efforts is a re-architecture of the user interface. Microsoft abandoned the desktop metaphor of the Start menu driving a list of applications. While that was acceptable on the desktop, it wasn't well received in the mobile environment.