Intel Wearable Competition Down to Final 10

Intel Wearable Competition Down to Final 10
Keeping the Mother-Child Bond
Getting the Player's Perspective
A View From Above
The Power of Touch
A New Hand at a Low Cost
A Soothing Sensation, When Needed
Hitting the Slopes in Style
Giving Children a Healthy Start
Data in the Palm of Your Hands
Putting All the Wearable Pieces Together
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Intel Wearable Competition Down to Final 10

By Jeffrey Burt

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Keeping the Mother-Child Bond

Developers Raphael PM Lang and Camilo Anabalon created a bionic mattress designed to keep mothers linked with babies who are in incubation environments in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The device delivers haptic information—the sense of touch via forces or motions—from the mother to the child in real time.

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Getting the Player's Perspective

First V1sion, a broadcast system, enables the player's point of view—in sports like football, basketball and tennis—to be seen. The technology was developed by Jose Ildefso, Angeliki Terezaki, Roger Antunez and Anastasia Pistofidou.

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A View From Above

Nixie is a wearable camera that can be unfolded and fly. It was created by Christoph Kohstall, Jelena Jovanovic and Michael Niedermayr.

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The Power of Touch

Vumbl is a sports and activity necklace that takes in information from the wearer's body through vibrations, and then sends the information back to the user via touch. The developers are Tom Shrive, James Price, Mark Siddorn and Samuel Tassell.

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A New Hand at a Low Cost

This robotic hand—developed by Open Bionics founder Joel Gibbard and Sammy Payne—is designed to offer the user advanced functionally for less than $1,000.

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A Soothing Sensation, When Needed

If the user needs a cool or warm touch, the Wristify band is there to provide it, on demand. The creators—Matthew Smith, Sam Shames, Megha Jain and David Cohen-Tanugi—say the device can communicate with and respond to the wearer.

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Hitting the Slopes in Style

Snowcookie is designed to take in a skier's kinetics and physiology information, throw in some crowd-sourced ski data and enhance a user's safety and technique, and connect them with other winter sports enthusiasts. The developers are Martin Kawalski, Zbigniew Nawrat, Piotr Lukasik and Ewa Waliczek.

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Giving Children a Healthy Start

BabyGuard, developed by Xiaoshan Huang, Shuai Ye and Chen Guo, was built to provide smart health care for babies for the first three years of their lives.

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Data in the Palm of Your Hands

The developers describe ProGlove as "a professional wearable production tool that enables the user to work faster and easier." It also offers business intelligence and control for production management, say the creators, Paul Gunther, Jonas Girardet, Thomas Kirchner and Alexander Grots.

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Putting All the Wearable Pieces Together

Users can leverage the Blocks hardware and software platform to create the wearable technology they need. They can chose what blocks they need to do the job and get the look they want, and then snap those blocks together to create a unique wearable band, according to developers Serge Vasylechko, Hakeem Javaid and Omer Al Fakir.

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