10 Reasons Why the Crowd-Sourced Jolla Tablet Is Worth Checking Out

 
 
By Don Reisinger  |  Posted 2014-11-20
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    10 Reasons Why the Crowd-Sourced Jolla Tablet Is Worth Checking Out
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    10 Reasons Why the Crowd-Sourced Jolla Tablet Is Worth Checking Out

    By Don Reisinger
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    The Design Is Actually Quite Nice
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    The Design Is Actually Quite Nice

    The first thing anyone will notice about the Jolla tablet is that it's well-designed. While it might not be as thin as devices like the Nokia N1 or the iPad Mini 3, it breaks away from the standard rounded corners and other design features found in today's products and delivers something novel. It's nice to see Jolla going above and beyond typical tablet designs.
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    Sailfish Customization Could Be a Killer Feature
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    Sailfish Customization Could Be a Killer Feature

    One of the big advantages to Sailfish OS, the operating system in the Jolla Tablet, is that anyone can customize the software to suit special needs. In the enterprise, especially, that could prove to be an important feature as companies quickly alter the operating system to serve particular applications or business plans. That's something you don't see with Android or iOS.
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    It Works With Android Apps Already
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    It Works With Android Apps Already

    There should be no issue getting apps to work on the Jolla Tablet. The device's software includes full support for the vast majority of Android applications, which means the tablet will launch with a huge library of supported software. One of the main reasons other devices running new operating systems die is the lack of software support. Jolla won't suffer from that problem.
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    Jolla Promises a High Level of Data Privacy and Security
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    Jolla Promises a High Level of Data Privacy and Security

    One of the major aspects of the Jolla mission is to support a high level of data privacy. The company has made a public commitment with the Jolla Tablet that it will not share any user data and will not allow for any backdoor access to user data through third-party apps. That's a major selling point for companies.
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    The Hardware Specifications Are Solid
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    The Hardware Specifications Are Solid

    Overall, the specs provided in the Jolla Tablet are solid. The device will ship with a 1.8GHz quad-core Intel-based processor, as well as 32GB of storage and 2GB of RAM. The tablet also comes with a respectable 5-megapixel camera and a 7.9-inch display that boasts 330 pixels per inch.
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    Jolla Is Inviting the Public to Suggest Improvements
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    Jolla Is Inviting the Public to Suggest Improvements

    Jolla is doing something rather interesting with Sailfish and the tablet: It's opening up design ideas to the public. Through a "Together" forum, users can submit upgrade ideas for the Sailfish OS and the tablet hardware. From there, the community will vote on the ideas, and the Jolla team will implement the most popular concepts. The company did the same thing for the Jolla Smartphone.
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    It's a Worthwhile Alternative to the iPad Mini 3
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    It's a Worthwhile Alternative to the iPad Mini 3

    Jolla has made it clear that it views its tablet as an alternative to the iPad Mini 3. And based on the features we know about so far and the fact that it's running an open-source operating system, it might be a worthwhile alternative. It seems rather unlikely that the tablet would be able to beat the iPad Mini 3 in sales, since Jolla so far has only sold an initial production run of 1,000 units, but it could ramp up production if the device proves popular. As of right now, it appears to have a fighting chance at becoming a contender in the tablet market.
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    Consider Some of the Neat Software Features
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    Consider Some of the Neat Software Features

    So, what exactly does Sailfish offer that users won't necessarily find done as well elsewhere? First off, the operating system has a multitasking function that allows users to see all of their running apps in a single view. Switching between apps is also extremely easy, and it analyzes a wide range of hand movements to interpret them as gestures that control the software. While forms of all of these features are available in other products, Jolla's Sailfish arguably does it better.
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    This Isn't a First-Generation Product
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    This Isn't a First-Generation Product

    One of the big questions that has to occur to many potential buyers, particularly business buyers, is whether the tablet a first-generation product that isn't reliable enough for sustainable productivity. Historically, the corporate world has shunned first-generation devices for fear of them hurting productivity. While the hardware will be first-generation, the company's software is actually in its second iteration and, judging by the reviews, is getting better each day. So on the surface, the Jolla Tablet doesn't look like an unreliable prototype.
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    This Isn't Your Typical Mobile Device Maker
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    This Isn't Your Typical Mobile Device Maker

    It's rather refreshing to see Jolla come on the scene and make a splash in a tablet market dominated by huge manufacturers. Jolla calls itself "people-powered," and it's hard to argue with the business model. Jolla enlists the help of the community, gives power to its users and is actively seeking the public's help with funding through the crowd-sourcing model. Jolla should at least get credit for trying to break the mobile industry mold, and it will be fascinating to see if it can grow from a small venture into a thriving enterprise.
 

There's a new tablet brand in town, and this one is garnering all kinds of attention despite the initial small production run—the Jolla Tablet. Called the "first truly crowd-sourced tablet," it is part of a campaign running on Indiegogo. As of this writing, tablet startup Jolla has raised nearly $670,000 on Indiegogo on its tablet production project, easily surpassing its goal of $300,000 on its first day of the campaign. Best of all for Jolla, the device has 21 days left to generate even more cash. Jolla was formed in October 2011 after a number of former Nokia employees left the company to start a mobile firm that leveraged the MeeGo open-source operating system developed by Nokia and Intel. The company started with financial help from Nokia and from then on, it worked on its open-source operating system Sailfish, which is loosely based on MeeGo. While the company has already introduced the Jolla Phone, a smartphone running the Sailfish OS, the news that the Finland-based company is getting into tablets is notable for both consumers and enterprise customers. For consumers, the tablet comes with a solid design, while enterprise customers will benefit from its open-sourced security and support for current Android applications. This eWEEK slide show looks at the features that make the crowd-sourced Jolla tablet worth checking out.

 
 
 
 
 
Don Reisinger is a freelance technology columnist. He started writing about technology for Ziff-Davis' Gearlog.com. Since then, he has written extremely popular columns for CNET.com, Computerworld, InformationWeek, and others. He has appeared numerous times on national television to share his expertise with viewers. You can follow his every move at http://twitter.com/donreisinger.
 
 
 
 
 
 

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