5 Common Mistakes Companies Make in Their Mobile Policies

 
 
By Darryl K. Taft  |  Posted 2016-08-12
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    1 - 5 Common Mistakes Companies Make in Their Mobile Policies
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    5 Common Mistakes Companies Make in Their Mobile Policies

    When creating a formal enterprise mobility policy, beware of these five common pitfalls to ensure the policy is beneficial to both the business and employees.
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    2 - Rolling Out a Policy Without First Understanding the Business Impact
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    Rolling Out a Policy Without First Understanding the Business Impact

    Whether it's to help maintain work efficiencies, reduce roaming overages or ensure employees have consistent access to work information when remote, there must be an understanding of what a policy is trying to achieve before the company implements it. Once this goal is defined, companies should measure the policy's effectiveness consistently. The general values of having mobile policies are to make employees more productive and increase company efficiencies. If these aren't immediately defined, it's going to be hard to determine what needs to be adjusted or fixed.
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    3 - Lack of Communication Between Managers and Employees
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    Lack of Communication Between Managers and Employees

    The easiest way to ensure employees are confused about what is and isn't included in a company mobile policy is to leave them in the dark on the details. Managers need to keep a consistent and open line of communication with employees through multiple channels, such as email, printed handouts and automated notifications on work devices. The policies also need to be explained in a way employees understand, realizing that not everyone will comprehend the details of the policy immediately and may require some extra coaching. Open communication not only will give employees a better understanding of what is involved, but they also will be held more accountable to follow mobile policies.
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    4 - Rushing Creation of Policies to Save Costs or Hit Deadlines
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    Rushing Creation of Policies to Save Costs or Hit Deadlines

    Factors such as cost savings, timing or rollout deadlines can spur companies to force mobile policies on employees that may not be the best fit for their business or workforce. While it may be tempting to hit the implementation deadline, companies must be flexible with mobile policies and listen to feedback they receive from employees. Make sure any policy instituted contributes to the purpose, productivity and process of a business. Then, if there are kinks, companies must address them in real time along the way, versus trying to make it work as-is. This will lead to more successful adoption of the policy in the end.
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    5 - Losing Focus on Customer and Employee Needs
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    Losing Focus on Customer and Employee Needs

    Companies trying to work through a new or adjusted mobile policy often can lose sight of those who will use the policy the most: customers and employees. Companies and vendors assisting them must make sure they always keep the users top of mind throughout the entire implementation process. Training, regular policy updates and communicating in a way customers and employees can understand not only will make them feel more involved, but will also help ensure there will be fewer hiccups during the policy rollout.
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    6 - Forgetting to Consider Company Culture
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    Forgetting to Consider Company Culture

    If a company has a primarily mobile-first workforce, its policy will be completely different from that of a company that relies primarily on desktops and desk phones. Forgetting to consider the culture of a workforce could result in policies that aren't the best fit or rollouts that are received poorly because of confusion. For example, if a company limits the type of devices employees can use for work purposes, it could risk employees not being able to adapt to a new device or bringing their own, unauthorized ones instead. Companies must work with employees to ensure a policy that fits employee workflow and offers training options or onsite deployment as needed for those that aren't as tech-savvy.
 

No technological advancement has impacted business efficiency and office environments as quickly and completely as enterprise mobility has. Employees are finding new ways to incorporate their mobile devices into their work, while businesses are simultaneously growing more and more dependent on this technology to function productively. Unfortunately, this creates extra work for companies needing to effectively manage devices and the complex ecosystems they are capable of creating. For many organizations, it's unclear which employee or department is tasked with this responsibility, so it's important that companies outline and formalize a mobile policy that successfully manages their enterprise mobility program. If your business hasn't created a mobile policy yet, you're in luck. This eWEEK slide show, pulled from the web resources of MOBI, which has worked with some of the world's largest enterprise mobility programs, lists five common corporate mobile policy pitfalls that your business would be better off avoiding when it comes to formalizing one.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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