ARM Reached From IoT to the Data Center at TechCon 2015

 
 
By Jeffrey Burt  |  Posted 2015-11-17
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    1 - ARM Reached From IoT to the Data Center at TechCon 2015
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    ARM Reached From IoT to the Data Center at TechCon 2015

    ARM wants to extend the reach of its silicon designs into new markets. At its TechCon 2015 show, the talk focused on subjects like servers, security and IoT.
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    2 - Delivering the Message
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    Delivering the Message

    ARM CTO Mike Muller, left, and CEO Simon Segars touted the company's efforts in IoT, wearables and security, and also talked about servers and, yes, mobile devices.
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    3 - Telling an End-to-End Story
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    Telling an End-to-End Story

    One of the overarching themes throughout the event was ARM's ambition to power all systems, from the smallest devices at the edge to the servers in the data center and cloud.
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    4 - ARM and IoT
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    ARM and IoT

    ARM officials see the company's low-power chip designs as a natural fit for IoT and all the small devices that will demand high performance, battery life and energy efficiency. There were a range of smartwatches on display at the show, including Samsung's Gear s2 (right).
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    5 - The Future of Automobiles
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    The Future of Automobiles

    Self-driving cars are coming, and they're going to need a lot of intelligence. One thing they'll have to do is be able to identify people in the road and react accordingly. Freescale was demonstrating a pedestrian detection system from Neusoft that is running on one of the chip maker's ARM-based S32V234 processors.
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    6 - IoT Is Good for the Feet
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    IoT Is Good for the Feet

    Smart running shoes from Li-Ning are powered by an ARM-based DA 14580 microcontroller from Dialog Semiconductor.
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    7 - Tracking Who's in the Building
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    Tracking Who's in the Building

    Silicon Labs' smart badges, which are powered by an ARM-based SoC and track the wearers' presence, were on display at TechCon 2015.
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    8 - Getting the Full, Immersive Experience
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    Getting the Full, Immersive Experience

    Virtual reality is a fast-growing part of the tech industry, and one being targeted by ARM and its partners. Here is a Zeiss VR headset that is linked to a Samsung Galaxy S6 smartphone, which is powered by Samsung's eight-core Exynos 7 and features ARM's big.Little architecture.
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    9 - ARM Moves Up the Ladder
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    ARM Moves Up the Ladder

    ARM and its partners also are targeting the server space, looking to chip away at Intel's dominance in the space. Cavium, with its ThunderX SoC, had several systems and boards on display at the show.
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    10 - Applied Micro Readies X-Gene 3
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    Applied Micro Readies X-Gene 3

    Applied Micro CEO Paramesh Gopi introduced the next generation of the company's server SoCs, saying it will challenge Intel's Xeon E5 and E7 processors. It will begin sampling in the second half of 2016.
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    11 - SoftIron and AMD
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    SoftIron and AMD

    Startup SoftIron was at the show with its Overdrive 3000, an enterprise-class development platform powered by eight 64-bit ARM-based Opteron A1100 Series SoCs from Advanced Micro Devices.
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    12 - ARM Playing to Its Strengths
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    ARM Playing to Its Strengths

    While the IoT and data center may have been the focus of much of TechCon, ARM officials didn't ignore its strength in mobile devices. The company unveiled the Cortex-A35 SoC, a 64-bit chip aimed at low-cost, entry-level smartphones. It also will be used in IoT devices.
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    13 - Smartphones on Display
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    Smartphones on Display

    Plenty of smartphones were on display, including Huawei's P8 (right), which is powered by the Kirin 930 chip manufactured by its HiSilicon unit. Other smartphones at the show came from such vendors as LG Electronics, HTC and Meizu.
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    14 - ARM and Mobile Computing
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    ARM and Mobile Computing

    OEMs were demonstrating various laptops and other mobile computing devices that are powered by ARM-based chips. Those included Asus' Chromebook Flip (left), a device that can be used in either PC or tablet mode and is powered by a RK3288 SoC by Rockchip, and Sony's Xperia Z4 tablet, running on Qualcomm's Snapdragon 810 chip.
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    15 - Atmel Puts It All Out There
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    Atmel Puts It All Out There

    In what looked like the back of a tractor-trailer, Atmel had on display the ARM-based devices it powers, from smartphones to tablets to PCs.
 

SANTA CLARA, Calif.—ARM is best known for the dominance of its chip designs in smartphones and tablets. But at its TechCon 2015 show here last week, the talk was mostly about other subjects—in particular, servers, security and the Internet of things (IoT). ARM officials want to extend the reach of their silicon designs into an array of new market segments, and that was on display during the three-day conference, from the announcements that were made and the keynote addresses to the various technical sessions and many of the displays on the showroom floor. The company announced an effort to bring its TrustZone security platform to IoT devices, and also introduced the Cortex-A35 processor, a low-power design that not only will find its way into low-cost, entry-level smartphones, but embedded devices like wearables and IoT systems. ARM also got help from some of its partners, including Applied Micro's CEO Paramesh Gopi, who talked about his company's 64-bit X-Gene 3 ARM-based server chip, which he said will begin sampling later next year and will compete with Intel's mid-level and high-end Xeon processors. This eWEEK slide show takes a look at highlights of the event.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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