CeBIT Puts Spotlight on Internet of Things, Robotics, Security

 
 
By Wayne Rash  |  Posted 2015-03-18
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    CeBIT Puts Spotlight on Internet of Things, Robotics, Security
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    CeBIT Puts Spotlight on Internet of Things, Robotics, Security

    By Wayne Rash
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    Protesters Decry China's Human Rights Record at CeBIT
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    Protesters Decry China's Human Rights Record at CeBIT

    Protesters from Amnesty International greet attendees with banners deploring China's human rights practices. They made sure they were seen in the front plaza of the Hannover Fair Grounds.
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    Other Protesters Object to China's Internet Restrictions
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    Other Protesters Object to China's Internet Restrictions

    Standing to one side of the Amnesty International group, a second group of protesters complain about China's restrictions on free use of the Internet.
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    You Can Even Connect a Bicycle to the Internet of Things
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    You Can Even Connect a Bicycle to the Internet of Things

    This German-made Canyon bicycle is equipped with a reporting module that's installed inside of the bike's frame. The module includes a GPS and has a SIM card so that the owner can track the bicycle if it's stolen, it can call emergency workers if it crashes, it can monitor its own maintenance needs, and it can even order spare parts.
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    Your Desktop Things
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    Your Desktop Things

    Intel and Hewlett-Packard are demonstrating the practical use of an IoT device that's available now. This wireless docking station can sense when a properly equipped laptop is within range and transfer control to the docking station. Dell is making a similar device. In either case, the laptop needs to be equipped with a new gigabit wireless communications device.
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    Creating Industrial Designs on an iPad
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    Creating Industrial Designs on an iPad

    Designer Polina Slobodchikova from RoboChop begins a design using an iPad. The design will be produced on a networked industrial robot once she uploads it. The RoboChop software will run on any computer or mobile device running a supported browser. I was able to create a much less elegant design using my Windows laptop computer.
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    The Design Software Works With a Variety of Drawing Tools
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    The Design Software Works With a Variety of Drawing Tools

    Slobodchikova shows how she draws the design using the browser-based drawing tool. Here she sketches the design with her finger. But you can use anything from a mouse to a digitizing tablet.
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    The Design Becomes Reality
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    The Design Becomes Reality

    The robot shows off the first cut on Slobodchikova's design. It will turn and rotate the high-density foam cube to align it properly with the cutting device. When it's finished, the project will be placed on the shelves in the background, where it will later be collected for shipping. Anyone can try submitting a design at robochop.com during CeBIT. Designs that are chosen will be sent to the robots for production.
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    Monitoring Production Progress
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    Monitoring Production Progress

    Managers from RoboChop can monitor the progress of the robot's production in the management app. Here you can see Slobodchikova's design in the process of being completed.
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    Building a Security Camera Network on the IoT
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    Building a Security Camera Network on the IoT

    Evercam.io has developed a way to include standard cameras, whether they're security cameras or something else, into the Internet of things by creating a management network that can talk to any of them. Here a security solution from Evercam links two security cameras and a camera phone into an IoT network so they can be used in a security system. The security systems can be aggregated and used to cover very large installations ranging from apartment and condominium complexes to factories.
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    Using the IoT to Aggregate Alarm Systems
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    Using the IoT to Aggregate Alarm Systems

    Security is turning out to be a hot area for companies developing applications for the Internet of things. Here, a self-contained, multifunction IoT alarm from Novi is tripped by SD Times reporter Alyson Behr as she approaches the device. These multifunction alarms can be aggregated into a much larger system and can be assembled into a remotely monitored alarm system, or they can operate independently.
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    Managing IoT Security in the Cloud
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    Managing IoT Security in the Cloud

    A SecuCloud representative shows how networked things can be made secure by linking them through a cloud management facility that controls their data streams and denies access to anything that's not part of that particular network.
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    Manufacturing on Demand Using the IoT
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    Manufacturing on Demand Using the IoT

    Representatives from Trumpf demonstrate a manufacturing on demand system by showing how they assemble the information in advance of starting a production project. Portions of this image would be extracted for use in creating a personalized insulated coffee mug.
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    Going From a Photo to an Etching Machine on the IoT
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    Going From a Photo to an Etching Machine on the IoT

    The design is extracted from an original photograph (in this case an anonymous eWEEK columnist) and is sent to the laser etching device, where it's etched into the stainless steel surface of the mug.
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    How Lego Blocks Support a Production Machine
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    How Lego Blocks Support a Production Machine

    Here's a look at the interior of the network-connected laser etching device that performed the final manufacturing steps in this IoT demonstration. And yes, this machine is built from the basic engineering prototype construction material of choice in nearly any industry, Legos.
 

HANNOVER, Germany—CeBIT this week launched into its second year as a pure IT show and in the process moved into some significant new classes of technology. The show also generated controversy for its decision to partner with China and to feature Chinese technology. But the technology getting the most interest isn't just Chinese, but rather a vast exhibit on the Internet of things (IoT) that features new companies from around the world that are making waves in that new area. Helping to draw interest—and crowds—is a prime IoT display area in the exhibit hall that focuses on new companies that are competing for investment as part of the Code_n incubator show. While most of the IoT innovations in the Code_n display are products aimed at home users, there are still quite a bit going on for the enterprise. Most of the these products are focused on security and manufacturing, both important areas where the instrumentation capabilities connected to the network can do a lot for a company's efficiency.

 
 
 
 
 
Wayne Rash Wayne has been a freelance writer and editor with a 35 year history covering technology. He's a frequent contributor to eWEEK and Techweb. Rash is a frequent guest on a variety of network news and talk shows, and has appeared recently on NPR, Fox Business News and NBC as a technology expert. He is the author of five books, including his most recent, "Politics on the Nets," which was featured on National Public Radio in October. You can mail Wayne here.
 
 
 
 
 
 

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