Cutting-Edge Gaming Units, TVs, Tablets, Smartwatches Make CES Splash

 
 
By Don Reisinger  |  Posted 2014-01-08 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The fun has only just begun at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, but already there have been a lot of major announcements. Some of the top companies in the industry, like LG and Samsung, have of course made their presence known, but so too have smaller firms, such as Roku. Even component makers are getting into the mix, showing off new products that could put extreme pressure on companies in the gaming business. Each January, CES plays an important role in our understanding of what to expect in the mobile, PC and gaming markets during the year. Nearly every major IT industry and consumer electronic company is in attendance at the show, and they all have something they want the world to see. In many cases, those companies introduce some of the most important products of the year. This slide show focuses on some of the biggest announcements in just the first 48 hours since CES convened. There is still plenty of time for even more major product announcements to come to light.

 
 
 
  • Cutting-Edge Gaming Units, TVs, Tablets, Smartwatches Make CES Splash

    By Don Reisinger
    Cutting-Edge Gaming Units, TVs, Tablets, Smartwatches Make CES Splash
  • Nvidia Takes the Wraps Off Gaming's New Chip: Tegra K1

    The gaming market might change drastically soon. Nvidia's Tegra K1 is a processor that the company says will be capable of delivering game graphics that exceed those of earlier-generation consoles. It'll take some time before the processors make their way to the marketplace. The 32-bit option won't come out until the first half of 2014, but it could make a splash when it appears.
    Nvidia Takes the Wraps Off Gaming's New Chip: Tegra K1
  • Roku Pulls an Apple

    Rumors have been swirling for years that Apple wants to launch a fully connected television. The trouble is, Roku already beat the iPhone maker to it. Roku, which has made a name for itself with its outstanding set-top boxes, announced at CES that it will launch a line of connected televisions running its software. Roku won't take on the heavy load of producing televisions itself, but will partner with TV makers. The televisions will feature more than 1,200 channels already available on Roku set-top boxes. Watch out, Apple.
    Roku Pulls an Apple
  • Sony's PlayStation Now Is a Wow

    Sony was rumored to be working on a game-streaming service for months, but it's finally a reality. Based on Gaikai's cloud-based technology, PlayStation Now will stream PlayStation 3 games to the PlayStation 4 and PlayStation 3. Sony says that it'll also work on most 2014 Bravia TV models. The service will allow users to play full games and pick up where they left off on any other Sony device compatible with PlayStation Now. It'll launch in the U.S. this summer.
    Sony's PlayStation Now Is a Wow
  • Samsung Tablets Get Bigger (and Better)

    Samsung is back at it with new tablets that put the entire market on notice. The Galaxy TabPro will ship with Android 4.4 (KitKat) and come with a whopping 12.2-inch screen. Those who want smaller versions can select the 10.1-inch or 8.4-inch options. Samsung also unveiled the Galaxy NotePro, a successor to its previous Note tablets. Both devices will ship this year and come with a new Samsung-designed user interface the company's calling Magazine UX. So far, they're the best-looking tablets on the CES showroom floor.
    Samsung Tablets Get Bigger (and Better)
  • Pebble Makes Fashion Statement With Steel Smartwatch

    Pebble, which made a name for itself on the Kickstarter.com crowd-funding site, is showing off a slick steel smartwatch. The new Pebble watches can't match Rolex on design, but they make it far more likely that people who are concerned about fashion might opt for a smartwatch. The Pebble Steel smartwatch even comes with a leather band for those who prefer the classic look. It's a neat device.
    Pebble Makes Fashion Statement With Steel Smartwatch
  • LG Reboots WebOS as Smart TV Interface

    When LG took over WebOS after that operating system's steady descent into obscurity in the hands of Hewlett-Packard, the company promised something special for televisions. That something special made its way to CES. LG unveiled a beautiful WebOS smart TV interface that works with both the old-school push-button remote controls and the company's motion-enabled remote control. That option places a cursor on the screen that tracks a user's movements, allowing the user to pick apps, select programming and more.
    LG Reboots WebOS as Smart TV Interface
  • Samsung, LG Flex Their Television Screens

    Speaking of LG, the Korean device maker, along with Samsung, showed off flexible OLED televisions. The idea might prove to be more novelty than a practical product at the moment, but it begs an interesting question: Can flexible televisions replace the rigid options of old? We'll find out.
    Samsung, LG Flex Their Television Screens
  • Intel Confirms Push Button Android, Windows Support

    Watch out, Microsoft: Intel confirmed at CES that its processors this year will be capable of switching between Android and Windows with the press of a button. The move could encourage the introduction of more devices running both Android and Windows and could possibly hurt Microsoft's chances of gaining ground in the mobile space. It's an interesting development that could have a profound impact on mobile devices.
    Intel Confirms Push Button Android, Windows Support
  • The Great Steam Machine Invasion

    Valve's Linux-based SteamOS will be running in potentially dozens of game set-top boxes in the coming year. At CES, Valve, along with partners Dell, Falcon Northwest, Origin PC and others, revealed several products running its gaming operating system. SteamOS will be capable of delivering PC games to the television over the Web, similar to PlayStation Now. Unlike Sony's plan, however, Valve wants to see as many companies as possible adopt SteamOS and get their products into homes. That could cause a serious shift in gaming if that happens.
    The Great Steam Machine Invasion
  • MakerBot Makes 3D Printing More Accessible

    MakerBot at CES unveiled a new line of 3D printers. One of the more interesting announcements was the Replicator Mini, a 3D printer priced at $1,375, its lowest-cost printer yet. The new Replicator costs just $2,899, while the Z18, which is designed for large products, will go for $6,499. With MakerBot's latest product line, 3D printing just became a lot more accessible to small businesses as well as the average consumer.
    MakerBot Makes 3D Printing More Accessible
 
 
 
 
 
Don Reisinger is a freelance technology columnist. He started writing about technology for Ziff-Davis' Gearlog.com. Since then, he has written extremely popular columns for CNET.com, Computerworld, InformationWeek, and others. He has appeared numerous times on national television to share his expertise with viewers. You can follow his every move at http://twitter.com/donreisinger.
 
 
 
 
 
 

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