Google Debunks Top 10 Google Glass Myths

 
 
By Todd R. Weiss  |  Posted 2014-03-28 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Google Glass has received quite a reception since the first units were made available to Glass Explorer beta users back in April 2013. Several more beta rollouts have followed, providing an ever-widening group of beta testers willing to pony up the $1,500 it costs to buy the controversial eyewear-mounted computers. Many beta testers have posted their reviews, observations and amazement about living with Glass on social media networks, have blogged about their experiences and have even been inspired to dream big ideas for using Glass in everyday life. But what Google might not have expected is the public criticism that Glass has also inspired. Glass has evoked outright bans in some bars, restaurants and other businesses, as well as privacy concerns from some people who just don't like the idea of Glass wearers recording them or viewing them using the devices. Google is apparently getting a bit testy about some of the "myths" and negative things reported about Glass because the company recently launched a list of its "Top 10 Google Glass Myths" to try to allay and disprove some of those concerns. Here is Google's list, which was posted on the Google Glass Google+ page on March 20.

 
 
 
  • Google Debunks Top 10 Google Glass Myths

    by Todd R. Weiss
    1 - Google Debunks Top 10 Google Glass Myths
  • Myth 1: Glass Is the Ultimate Distraction From the Real World

    Nonsense, says Google. Instead, Glass allows you to look up and engage with the world rather than look down at your phone and become isolated. "That's why Glass is off by default and only on when you want it to be. It's designed to get you a bit of what you need just when you need it and then get you back to the people and things in life you care about," Google wrote in its post.
    2 - Myth 1: Glass Is the Ultimate Distraction From the Real World
  • Myth 2: Glass Is Always On and Recording Everything

    Untrue, says Google. "Just like your cell phone, the Glass screen is off by default. Video recording on Glass is set to last 10 seconds. People can record for longer, but Glass isn't designed for or even capable of always-on recording (the battery won't last longer than 45 minutes before it needs to be charged)."
    3 - Myth 2: Glass Is Always On and Recording Everything
  • Myth 3: Glass Explorers Are Technology-Worshipping Geeks

    Actually, says Google, Glass Explorers come from all walks of life and are not just tech-centric users. "They include parents, firefighters, zookeepers, brewmasters, film students, reporters, and doctors. The one thing they have in common is that they see the potential for people to use technology in a way that helps them engage more with the world around them, rather than distract them from it. In fact, many Explorers say because of Glass they use technology less, because they're using it much more efficiently."
    4 - Myth 3: Glass Explorers Are Technology-Worshipping Geeks
  • Myth 4: Glass Is Ready for Prime Time

    Not so, says Google. In fact, there are still lots of questions to be answered. "Glass is a prototype, and our Explorers and the broader public are playing a critical role in how it's developed. In the last 11 months, we've had nine software updates and three hardware updates based, in part, on feedback from people like you. Ultimately, we hope even more feedback gets baked into a polished consumer product ahead of being released."
    5 - Myth 4: Glass Is Ready for Prime Time
  • Myth 5: Glass Does Facial Recognition (and Other Dodgy Things)

    Absolutely not true, says Google. "As we've said before, regardless of technological feasibility, we made the decision based on feedback not to release or even distribute facial-recognition Glassware unless we could properly address the many issues raised by that kind of feature. And just because a weird application is created, doesn't mean it'll get distributed in our MyGlass store. We manually approve all the apps that appear there and have several measures in place (from developer policies and screenlocks to warning interstitials) to help protect people's security on the device."
    6 - Myth 5: Glass Does Facial Recognition (and Other Dodgy Things)
  • Myth 6: Glass Covers Your Eye(s)

    Another myth that's not even close, says Google. "The Glass screen is deliberately above the right eye, not in front or over it. It was designed this way because we understand the importance of making eye contact and looking up and engaging with the world, rather than down at your phone."
    7 - Myth 6: Glass Covers Your Eye(s)
  • Myth 7: Glass Is the Perfect Surveillance Device

    Phooey, says Google. "If a company sought to design a secret spy device, they could do a better job than Glass! Let's be honest: if someone wants to secretly record you, there are much, much better cameras out there than one you wear conspicuously on your face and that lights up every time you give a voice command, or press a button."
    8 - Myth 7: Glass Is the Perfect Surveillance Device
  • Myth 8: Glass Is Only for Those Privileged Enough to Afford It

    Yes, current Glass beta devices cost $1,500 each, but by the time they are eventually available for retail sale, that price will come down sharply, says Google. "The current prototype costs $1,500, and we realize that is out of the range of many people. But that doesn't mean the people who have it are wealthy and entitled. In some cases, their work has paid for it. Others have raised money on Kickstarter and Indiegogo. And for some, it's been a gift."
    9 - Myth 8: Glass Is Only for Those Privileged Enough to Afford It
  • Myth 9: Glass Is Banned ... EVERYWHERE

    A total fabrication, says Google. "Since cell phones came onto the scene, folks have been pretty good at creating etiquette and the requisite (and often necessary) bans around where someone can record (locker rooms, casino floors, etc.). Since Glass functionality mirrors the cell phones (down to the screen being off by default), the same rules apply. Just bear in mind, would-be banners: Glass can be attached to prescription lenses, so requiring Glass to be turned off is probably a lot safer than insisting people stumble about blindly in a locker room."
    10 - Myth 9: Glass Is Banned ... EVERYWHERE
  • Myth 10: Glass Marks the End of Privacy

    No more than any other new kinds of devices, says Google. "When cameras first hit the consumer market in the late 19th century, people declared an end to privacy. Cameras were banned in parks, at national monuments and on beaches. People feared the same when the first cell phone cameras came out. Today, there are more cameras than ever before. In 10 years there will be even more cameras, with or without Glass."
    11 - Myth 10: Glass Marks the End of Privacy
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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