Intel, Partners Show Off Edison Platform for Wearable Devices, IoT

 
 
By Jeff Burt  |  Posted 2014-09-11
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    Intel, Partners Show Off Edison Platform for Wearable Devices, IoT
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    Intel, Partners Show Off Edison Platform for Wearable Devices, IoT

    By Jeffrey Burt
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    Krzanich Introduces Edison
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    Krzanich Introduces Edison

    Intel's CEO holds up an Edison platform, telling the crowd: "What I really hope to see is an explosion of innovation based on this platform." (Photo by Intel)
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    Protecting the Bicyclist
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    Protecting the Bicyclist

    Several Intel interns from the University of Oregon have developed a bike helmet that includes an Edison platform that will receive calls from a smartphone if there is a crash, and will call emergency responders if there is no response from the biker. It also plays music.
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    Game Prototype Tests Reaction Time
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    Game Prototype Tests Reaction Time

    Intel developers have created a game that tests the reaction time of players. When a light on the board turns on, each player tries to hit his or her button first. The data is collected and results correlated.
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    Going From Galileo to Edison
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    Going From Galileo to Edison

    Initially, the wireless gateway used in the reaction game was based on the Galileo board (top), but designers are making the move to Edison.
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    Making the Spiders Jump
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    Making the Spiders Jump

    Intel interns from the University of Arizona created a development project featuring mechanical spiders.
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    Edison Gives the Spiders More Staying Power
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    Edison Gives the Spiders More Staying Power

    The first spiders were powered by the Galileo platform, held in the large black box. The developers will switch to Edison—seen in the upper left corner—which is smaller and will enable them to give the spiders a larger battery.
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    Making the Construction Helmet Smarter
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    Making the Construction Helmet Smarter

    Another project is designed to connect construction helmets to the cloud. The helmet will record if a person falls or is struck in the head; it will also monitor for gas. It's also now powered by Galileo, with plans to switch to Edison.
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    Helmet Will Call for Help
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    Helmet Will Call for Help

    If the sensors in the helmet indicate a problem, an application will say where the helmet is and who is using it, and will show its location via a map. It also will send out a push notification.
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    Bright Lights and a Pretty Dress
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    Bright Lights and a Pretty Dress

    The Synapse mind-controlled dress, created by Dutch designer Anouk Wipprecht, uses embedded LEDs in the dress that change in pattern and intensity in response to the wearer's concentration and physical surroundings.
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    A Robot for the IoT
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    A Robot for the IoT

    Trossen Robotics is using Edison in its newest robot, the HR-OS1. Its frame and electronics are open-source and can be customized with 3D printable shells. It's controlled via a tablet or smartphone.
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    Navigating Treacherous Paths
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    Navigating Treacherous Paths

    An Edison-based connected rover device can be used, for example, to navigate around farmlands to test the moisture in the soil and send back the results via the Internet.
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    A Rocket for Education
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    A Rocket for Education

    Magnitude.io uses rocket science to teach K-12 students about science. The students build the rocket, which is equipped with sensors, and send it about 50,000 feet into the air, getting back--via the cloud—data on barometric pressure, humidity, temperature and location. There also is an HD camera on board.
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    Edison Inside the Rocket
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    Edison Inside the Rocket

    Until recently, Magnitude was using other technologies in the rocket, which breaks into several pieces that land easily to Earth, thanks to parachutes. Several months ago, the developers began using Edison inside.
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    The Power of Edison to Change Eating Habits
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    The Power of Edison to Change Eating Habits

    This development project was created to show how a single Edison platform can run several systems and hopefully get people to eat better. It runs the camera, which can sense when new objects are in place in front of it. When an apple is in front, the camera's software records it, the robotic cat gives a satisfied nod and the lights glow certain colors. When a bag of chips is used, the cat shakes its head and the lights change color.
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    Edison From Above
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    Edison From Above

    3D Robotics is putting Edison into its most recent drone, the Iris+. The system can be used to take photos from above, take measurements like humidity, and keep track of a moving person using the company's 3PV Follow Me technology.
 

SAN FRANCISCO—Intel CEO Brian Krzanich told attendees at the Intel Developer Forum (IDF) 2014 show here that key parts of the chip maker's push into the Internet of things (IoT) and wearable devices will be partnerships with other vendors and developers and creating an ecosystem of hardware and software based on the Intel Architecture. Last year, the company released a development board, dubbed "Galileo," based on the company's new small, low-power Quark chips and designed to give hardware and software developers a tool to help them quickly build products that run on Intel technology. At IDF, Krzanich announced Edison, another development platform for building smart systems that includes Atom and Quark silicon, integrated dual-band WiFi and Bluetooth, a framework for device-to-device and device-to-cloud communications, 1GB of memory and 4GB of flash storage. Krzanich said he expects products based on Edison—which will sell for $50—to start hitting the market by year's end. Throughout the Moscone Center here, development projects and commercial products running on Edison were on display. This eWEEK show offers a glimpse of some of them.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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