Intel Talks Drones, Robots, Wearables at CES 2016

 
 
By Jeffrey Burt  |  Posted 2016-01-08 Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    1 - Intel Talks Drones, Robots, Wearables at CES 2016
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    Intel Talks Drones, Robots, Wearables at CES 2016

    Intel used CES to demonstrate what it has to offer beyond chips for PCs—from connected cars and drones to robots, wearables and anything else that makes up IoT.
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    2 - How Many Drones Does It Take to Spell 'Intel'?
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    How Many Drones Does It Take to Spell 'Intel'?

    In this case, 100. The Intel-powered drones were launched in a field in Germany on the day CES kicked off at an event that took Intel engineers and digital artists from Ars Electronica FutureLab a month to plan. There were lights and an orchestra, and it made the Guinness Book of World Records for the "most unmanned aerial vehicles airborne simultaneously."
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    3 - Krzanich Drones On
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    Krzanich Drones On

    The CEO holds a Typhoon H drone from Yuneec that is powered by an Intel Atom processor and uses RealSense technology to avoid collisions while in the air. Intel demonstrated the drone's capabilities during the keynote.
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    4 - Drones on Parade
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    Drones on Parade

    Intel showed off Intel-powered unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) during CES. Drones are a key part of the chip maker's future plans: Intel last year invested $60 million in Yuneec and, just as the show got underway, announced it had bought drone software maker Ascending Technologies.
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    5 - When a Segway Is More Than a Segway
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    When a Segway Is More Than a Segway

    Intel showed off a Segway from Ninebot that also transforms into a robot that can not only provide personal transportation, but also other applications, such as interacting with other people and sensors in a home. It's powered by an Atom chip and uses a RealSense ZR300 camera.
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    6 - Making a Memorable Entrance
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    Making a Memorable Entrance

    Krzanich took a ride on the CES stage on the Ninebot robot, being greeted by Gary Shapiro, president and CEO of the Consumer Technology Association.
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    7 - The Technology of Sports
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    The Technology of Sports

    Sports played a key role in what Krzanich and Intel partners talked about during CES. Personal technology promises to have a significant impact in the space, from how athletes train to how fans experience the events.
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    8 - Intel Heads to the X Games
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    Intel Heads to the X Games

    The chip maker is partnering with ESPN to use the Curie module during the event in Aspen, Colo., where it will be integrated into snowboards to deliver real-time data on athletes' performances (such as in-air rotations and jump height). The data can be used by athletes, announcers and viewers. Here, as Mark McMorris takes to the air, Intel engineer Stephanie Moyerman checks the real-time data.
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    9 - Curie Can Also Go Into Bikes
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    Curie Can Also Go Into Bikes

    During his keynote, Krzanich demonstrated BMX bikes outfitted with Curie modules that track and deliver real-time performance statistics, such as speed, height, acceleration and rotation.
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    10 - Technology and the Evolution of the Running Shoe
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    Technology and the Evolution of the Running Shoe

    Krzanich and New Balance CEO Rob DeMartini, left, announced a partnership in which the two companies will develop wearable devices—such as running shoes with customized 3D-printed midsoles that use RealSense technology—to help athletes improve performance. Also, later this year, the companies will release a smartwatch.
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    11 - Do as the Coach Says
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    Do as the Coach Says

    Craig Alexander, three-time Ironman world champion, tries on Intel-powered smart eyewear from Oakley that includes Radar Pace, a voice-activated, real-time coaching system.
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    12 - Paintball Goes High-Tech
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    Paintball Goes High-Tech

    A paintball player tries out goggles from Recon Instruments that use Intel on-board sensors that enable real-time game and equipment statistics and data, such as how many paintballs are remaining and the location of teammates and opponents.
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    13 - Making Personalized Gaming More Personal
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    Making Personalized Gaming More Personal

    An Intel engineer uses a tablet that includes RealSense and software from Uraniom to scan Krzanich in 3D and then import the image to customize his in-game character in the game "Fallout 4."
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    14 - A New Way to Experience Art
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    A New Way to Experience Art

    At Intel's SenseScape display, people could interact with the exhibit through their movements—which were recognized by screens activated by RealSense, IoT-enabled harp strings and custom wearable devices—to create their own art installation.
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    15 - Combining Smarts With Fashion Smarts
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    Combining Smarts With Fashion Smarts

    Intel has been a proponent of combining wearable technology with fashion products like clothing, watches and jewelry. At CES, Krzanich and Becca McCharen, CEO of Chromat, demonstrate her company's Intel-powered Adrenaline smart dress and Aeros smart bra that can adapt to a woman's heart rate and perspiration.
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    16 - On the Road With Intel
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    On the Road With Intel

    Krzanich didn't say much about connected cars during his keynote, but they were a key topic during CES and Intel had its own automotive technology on display. The Land Rover F Pace from Jaguar included Intel automotive security technology, which helps create a vehicle that senses, responds and enhances security.
 

Intel still gets much of its revenue from chips that go into PCs, but company officials usually want to talk about the future, and that means everything from connected cars and drones to robots, wearables and anything else that is connected and makes up the growing Internet of things (IoT). And those were the types of devices and systems that came on stage with Intel CEO Brian Krzanich this week at CES 2016. During his presentation, Krzanich demonstrated the breadth of the company's products, from wearables running on the button-size Curie IoT computer module to what users can do with the 3D RealSense camera technology. For the most part, the keynote was as much about the experience that those systems bring with them as the devices themselves. It also was an indication about how wide-ranging Intel's ambitions are in getting its technology into as many new areas as possible. The contraction in the PC market has dinged Intel, and its strength in the data center—particularly with the growth of cloud environments—has helped offset the PC problems. But under Krzanich, the company has moved aggressively to capture emerging growth markets, and the CEO's presentation at CES put that on display. (Photos courtesy of Intel.)

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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