Microsoft Lumia 535 Aims for Budget-Conscious Buyers Sans Nokia Logo

 
 
By Don Reisinger  |  Posted 2014-11-12
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    Microsoft Lumia 535 Aims for Budget-Conscious Buyers Sans Nokia Logo
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    Microsoft Lumia 535 Aims for Budget-Conscious Buyers Sans Nokia Logo

    By Don Reisinger
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    Not a Bad Screen Size for Most Users
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    Not a Bad Screen Size for Most Users

    It may not be the biggest screen on the market, but at 5 inches in size, the Lumia 535's display is just right for many users. The device's screen is an IPS LCD that supports capacitive multipoint touch. At 5 inches, it should provide ample real estate to get work done and watch videos.
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    Microsoft Offers Multiple Color Choices—With an Emphasis on Orange
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    Microsoft Offers Multiple Color Choices—With an Emphasis on Orange

    Like other low- to mid-level smartphones on the market, the Lumia 535 comes in a wide range of colors, depending on user preference. Microsoft offers orange, black, gray, green, white and blue models to customers. Which color is best is up to the customer, but Microsoft seems to desire promoting the orange version, given that it has become the color chosen for all of its marketing efforts.
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    The Cameras Won't Blow Your Socks Off
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    The Cameras Won't Blow Your Socks Off

    Those looking for a high-end camera experience might want to look elsewhere. The rear-facing camera in the Lumia 535 is just 5 megapixels, putting it toward the lower end of the market. That said, the front camera is also a 5-megapixel lens with a wide angle to maximize the number of people who can be included in a selfie. It's a neat idea that could attract some customers.
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    It Has a Quad-Core Processor—With a Caveat
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    It Has a Quad-Core Processor—With a Caveat

    Like most other smartphones on the market right now, the Lumia 535 has a quad-core processor. However, the device's clock speed is just 1.2GHz and it's actually the Qualcomm Snapdragon 200 and not the Snapdragon 800 or 801 that higher-end Android devices are now shipping with. That's not necessarily a big deal, but it's something users hoping for more performance should keep in mind.
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    The Battery Life Is Quite Strong
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    The Battery Life Is Quite Strong

    One of the benefits of offering a lower-end device is that they typically consume less power and can last a long time on a single charge. According to Microsoft, the Lumia 535 has a maximum talk time over 2G networks of 11 hours and can stay on standby for 23 days. Its maximum talk time on 3G is 13 hours.
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    Yes, It Runs Windows Phone 8.1
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    Yes, It Runs Windows Phone 8.1

    No surprise here, but Microsoft's first branded smartphone is running Windows Phone 8.1. The operating system has the tile-based design that customers know from standard builds of Windows 8 and Windows 8.1. Windows Phone isn't for everyone, but those who feel comfortable with the current Windows "look" will like what they find in the Lumia 535.
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    Cortana Makes an Appearance
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    Cortana Makes an Appearance

    Cortana is another important addition to the Lumia 535. Cortana is essentially Microsoft's version of Siri, Apple's virtual personal assistant, and the software giant argues that it works better than Apple's option. Cortana appears to be central to Microsoft's software plans and will undoubtedly be featured in future Lumia devices.
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    There's Full Access to Windows Phone Store
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    There's Full Access to Windows Phone Store

    While the Windows Phone Store is not as big as the Apple App Store or the Google Play marketplace, it's still growing in size, and many of the most popular apps on other platforms, like Pandora, Shazam and Angry Birds, are available. In addition, Windows Phone supports standard Office and Xbox apps that only expand its usability.
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    Skype Comes Bundled With the Device
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    Skype Comes Bundled With the Device

    Everywhere one looks for a new Microsoft product, they'll find Skype. The VoIP service allows users to make voice calls, send out instant messages and place video calls. Best of all, it works cross-platform, so users can communicate with folks both on Microsoft platforms and not.
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    Onboard Data Storage Is Limited
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    Onboard Data Storage Is Limited

    Before deciding on the Lumia 535, customers should consider the storage limitations placed upon the device. The handset comes with 8GB of onboard storage, but is expandable up to 128GB with a microSD card. It's perhaps also worth noting that the Microsoft Lumia 535 comes with 15GB of free OneDrive cloud storage, so that should help get over the paltry amount of space built into the device.
 

The Nokia smartphone brand is officially dead. After a year of keeping the Nokia branding on its newly acquired mobile phone unit, Microsoft has unveiled the first  model—the Lumia 535—that ditches Nokia's logo and stands on its own as a product from the Redmond, Wash., software giant. But aside from this branding milestone, it's rather odd that the Lumia 535 is getting so much attention, given its specifications. The device is designed for budget-conscious shoppers who are seeking entry- to mid-level smartphones. Usually a device of this class wouldn't get that much attention. That is not to say that the Lumia 535 is a bad product or one that smartphone buyers shouldn't consider. The product has a decent design. Its big screen will appeal to many customers, and those who are used to Windows Phone 8.1 will like what they find in the operating system. In other words, the Lumia 535 might be able to stand on its own merit, despite the fact that it's getting so much attention because of what it doesn't have—the Nokia logo. But it certainly is a product of the Nokia Lumia design heritage. This eWEEK slide show highlights some of the Lumia 535's top features.

 
 
 
 
 
Don Reisinger is a freelance technology columnist. He started writing about technology for Ziff-Davis' Gearlog.com. Since then, he has written extremely popular columns for CNET.com, Computerworld, InformationWeek, and others. He has appeared numerous times on national television to share his expertise with viewers. You can follow his every move at http://twitter.com/donreisinger.
 
 
 
 
 
 

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