Will Motorola's Shatterproof Display Become a Smartphone Standard?

Today's topics include an analysis on Motorola’s shatterproof display, Red Hat and Microsoft have forged a wide-ranging cloud partnership, Microsoft nixes its unlimited OneDrive cloud storage, and Apple strikes a deal with bankrupt company GT Advanced Technologies.

At the end of October, Motorola announced the shatterproof display feature and four-year breakage guarantee of its new Droid Turbo 2.

The phone features a new Moto ShatterShield display that is built with five layers that are sandwiched together and designed to absorb shocks and not break.

At this point, the new design might be one of the toughest displays out there and could be attractive to users who have dropped their expensive smartphones and come away with cracked or shattered screens and devices that no longer work.

Linux vendor Red Hat has spent much of its existence fighting Microsoft Windows in the marketplace. Yesterday, in a surprising move, Red Hat and Microsoft entered into a broad partnership that will see Red Hat engineers co-located at Microsoft's headquarters in Redmond, Wash., as the two vendors aim to enable each other's cloud technologies.

The Red Hat Microsoft partnership includes multiple elements across the two companies' product portfolios. The deal incorporates integrated support services for hybrid cloud deployment, including Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) running in Microsoft's Azure Cloud.

During the ever-escalating cloud storage war last year, Microsoft bundled unlimited OneDrive storage with Office 365 Home, Personal and University plans. However since then, a few bad apples ruined things for everyone.

Microsoft’s OneDrive group claims that since the company started to roll out unlimited cloud storage to Office 365 consumer subscribers, a small number of users backed up numerous PCs and stored entire movie collections and DVR recordings.

So now, previously unlimited OneDrive storage for Office 365 consumer subscriptions is being knocked down to 1TB of storage, effective immediately.

Apple has come to an agreement with financially troubled sapphire glass supplier GT Advanced Technologies to auction off sapphire-making machines that Apple had lent the company $439 million to purchase in 2014.

According to a Nov. 3 story by The Wall Street Journal, by auctioning the sapphire-making equipment, GT Advanced, which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in October 2014, will then be able to pay back as much of the money as possible.

According to a statement by the company, GT Advanced filed for Chapter 11 so that it could continue to operate and work toward a reorganization plan to rebuild its business.

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